Lead Shower Pan


Can some one fill me in on replacing a 45 year old leaky lead shower pan situated on a concrete slab? How are lead pans attached to the shower drain? I'd like to find out before I tear into this and have an idea of what to expect.
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Locoweed wrote: How are lead pans attached to the shower drain?
There is a locking ring that gets bolted to the shower drain assembly, sandwiching the lead between the two. The newer plastic pan liner is cheaper and easier to use, it is installed the same way.
kenny b
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Hopefully the shower drain won't be brass and the lead pan soldered to it.

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Ron wrote:

Soldered? It may be leaded/wiped to the brass but it won't be soldered.
Maybe he could solder one of those new plastic pans back in there huh?
but then he wouldn't have any of them there weep holes would he.
kenny b
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Ave. Ken. Back in 1978 ? See this new water car ? I'll post it.

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Redjacket wrote:

I won't be able to check your post out for awhile, I'm taking off tomorrow to start the new life :) Hoping to be there by sunday, I'll save you a taco. Don't forget to turn out the lights and bring the flag when you make your move.
Addios amigo,
kenny b
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I wish you the best Ken !
grunmble..kick...what am I doing with a ratty NYS flag..... swear...spit..grumble more...

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do you have access to the underside of the shower? Is it on the ground level with basement below it?
it is usually best to gain access to the trap and replace it. I remove the entire old pan and open a small hole in the sheetrock ceiling above me if im above the first floor.

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Ned:
The house sits on a concrete slab and there is no access to the trap.
I think I may be in for quite a lot of work to replace the trap, which I have a gut feeling may need to be done once I start tearing into things. If this is the case, then I'll have to turn things over to a local plumber since I don't feel comfortable replacing this part of the plumbing system; nor do I have the correct equipment.
To play it safe, I'll have to consider the added expense for a new trap to my bathroom remodel.
Ned Flanders wrote:

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Loco,
The trap won't add $15 in material costs. The point is that if you cut the old trap off, and then put in a new PVC trap, you can then use a more modern base that's very easy to install.
The trick is getting the trap set in such a way that the riser hits dead center of the drain.
If your shower opening is a standard size, then you could even put in a pre-made base, which is easier yet.
From the way your talking, though, you might need some expert on-site advice. If you're brave, you could tackle it yourself, and then call in someone if you failed. It wouldn't hurt to try.
Mike
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