How to replace washers in 30-year old stuck taps, shut-off valve? - HELP

There is a small drip and an 0-ring and two washers need to be replaced in a 30-year old "Waltec" sink unit. However, both the "hot" and "cold" under-the-counter shut-off valves won't budge, even with a vise grip. Is there a way to stop the drip without having to call a plumber and spend $250? Thanks for all suggestions.
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Replace the valves yourself. MLD
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fancy nospam tunes wrote:

Is there no main shutoff for the building that sink unit is in?
Jeff
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My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

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Turn off the main valve for the whole house. It will be located in your cellar/crawlspace. More than likely it will be in a state of disrepair like the supply stops under the sink. It may start leaking profusely around the stem & if the washer in it is shot it will not turn off the water. If this happens you better be prepared to turn off the water at the curb cock with a water key. If the curb cock is inoperable, notify the local water authority as you will have an active leak at the main valve you won't be able to stop. After the water is off, it would then be advisable to repair/replace the main valve & valves under the sink. Eventually, you will be able address the problem of the sink faucet.
Or just bite the bullet & hire a pro. Now you see why a seemingly simple plumbing job can cost so much.

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If they're 30-years-old...don't even try to replace/repair anything. Buy a new valve and be done with it. Unless you have some really unusual high-dollar valve, there are very few old valves that are worth repairing. In fact, in most situations regarding your plumbing, you will find it cheapers to yank & replace. Toilets...cheaper to replace than it is to pay a plumber. Lavatory...kitchen sink...pretty much all of it...yank and replace.
On 27 Sep 2004 08:01:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (fancy nospam tunes) wrote:

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Good thing they didnt budge! if you put any more pressure on them they would break and never seal. Replace is the way to go.and while you are at it you should inspect all the valves in the house. If you are good at sweating valves turn off the main drain the system. Be sure to shut off water heater. If you get a plumber have him do all the old defective valves. It will save money in the long run.
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