Flexible Pipe

I need help finding a name for and a source for flexible water supply line. I have the following information: It is:
Reportedly wholesaled out of Reno Nevada. the cold lines are blue and the hot ones red It requires a few special tools to connect. It can be used in Ca. installations It is flexible.
Does anyone know of a product similar to these characteristics?
TIA
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Try your nearest RV center. My hot lines are red but my cold lines are white. Check the pressure ratings to make sure this will be ok with your plumbing project.

line.
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On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 22:36:58 -0800, Lex Luther wrote:

What you are looking for is Pex. It is all clear tubing, the red and the blue are a coating, both for identification and protection (pex has a problem with UV light). I believe that Vanguard sells out of Nevada and I know they have red and blue, but it is a grade "B" pex. I would use a grade "A" pex like Rehau.
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There are so many manufacturers making this stuff. go with an alumalined or copper lined product buy the fittings. Do it.. Dont bitch about it.

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I see the advantages of PEX but no one around here (California Central Coast) seems to use the stuff and no one stocks the tybing or fittings. All the plumbers still seem to be installing copper everywhere. Is this stuff legal in CA? And is it is so great, why isn't everyone using it for residential plumbing. Please educate me. I really want to go PEX if I can:)

line.
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Qest. Plastic just scares me
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Pex is great. Fast to install. Better flow rates to fixtures. Cost effective enough to allow "home run" systems. Why are most contractors still using copper? How about "We fear change" and something about "old dogs and new tricks"

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Copper just looks better

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In my area, most of the installations are being done with Pex. The nice thing about copper is that you can get a beautiful finished job. Pex just doesn't look as clean and professional. Some of the guys out here take great pride in their work and they want the visual appeal of their work to reflect their expertise. I agreed with that philosophy for a good many years. I switched to pex. However, I prefer the 20-foot sticks of pex instead of the rolled stuff. The straight-pex installs much neater.
I still build my entire shower valve out of copper. Doesn't make any sense to me to use pex for the riser to my showerhead.
I have changed up my distribution system. I used to follow code and reduce to catch three fixtures. These days, my entire installation is almost all 3/4" pipe. I pull off individual fixtures with 1/2". The extra diameter increases volume. It also allow me to just buy a handfull of 3/4 x 3/4 x 1/2 tees instead of trying to carry around a huge assortment to reduce to code. Makes my job simpler and it gives the customer more volume. Everybody wins.
I remember the copper days when you'd test the sytem and find a leak. That sucked. On a larger installation, you have to bleed off the water to fix a leak. Pex is a huge time saver.
Another huge time saver is to connect the water main at the street and run your pex gutline and install your sewer before the contractor installs the flooring. It makes your job MUCH easier and MUCH faster. In addition, when it comes time to test, you don't have to drag a bunch of garden hoses. Fill that entire system right at the tub spout and use an adapter on the shower head to top it off. Not only will you save time where you don't have to fuck with your trusty garden hose, you'll also pre-charge the water distribution system with water. Since the water distribution system is charged with water already, all you have to do is close your shutoff valve (which leaves the system charged with water at city pressure) and top the pressure off with your compressor. A large house charged with only air at 100-psi can water 45-minutes of your time filling the system with air. If the system is pre-charged with water...it'll take you about 3-minutes.
and since you already have your water main installed, you won't have a contractor bugging you to rush out there and quickly install the sewer/water (because the landscaper is waiting), you can have the guy digging the footing also dig your sewer line, and you can get paid for your sewer line at the same time you collect for the rough (more money in your pocket...and faster).
And finally, write your contract where the contractor does the high liability part of the work. Let the contractor have his guys install the toilets and sinks and other bullshit. That final part of the job (installing the fixtures) is where you have the most liability. So pass that liability off to the contractor. Make your money on the rough and sewer and get the hell out of there. You'll make more money as a rough-only plumber, have less liability, and the contractors will think you're wonderful because you're doing the job cheaper than anybody else in town (even though you're getting paid MORE than anybody else in town for your time).
On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 02:16:34 -0400, "Eric Miller"

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I *think cost is a factor also. Pex does have a high price IIRC.

fittings.
I
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