Drain Venting Valve

Does anyone make an 1.5" drain venting (air admittance) valve that can be used outdoors? Temperatures are not extreme but some rain splashing is likely.
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Why do you want a studor vent outdoors? Is there some reason you can't just vent to atmosphere?
Air admittance valves will ship with a degree of frost protection. But the one's I'm familiar with aren't really designed to protect against the extremes. If you're already outside, there's probably a better way to do whatever you're trying to do.
On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 03:50:00 GMT, Bennett Price

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I'm trying to vent a kitchen sink/dishwasher. The vent pipe stub is outdoors but is blocked by a bay window - it would be very difficult to go around the window and up to the roof. At present, the stub is open to the air but occasionally kitchen scraps bubble out the top.
Blackbeard wrote:

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You may want to try capping off that vent altogether and installing a vent under the kitchen cabinet. If the pipe is located directly under a bay window, it is not to code anyways. If you ever try to sell the house, a home inspector would notice the problem and you would have to fix it then in order to close.
They make a special trap assembly with an air admittance valve built into the assembly. Very easy to install....and CHEAP (about $25)
If you have access to the inside of the wall behind the kitchen sink, code also allows you to use an island vent. If you don't have access, find one of those trap assemblies with the air admittance valve built right in. Once installed, go ahead and cut and cap the existing pipe so it doesn't give you a problem in the future.
If the pipe is longer than 2-feet, code considers it a "dead end" and it can't be there. So if you're longer than 2-feet, go ahead and cap the pipe using a cleanout cap (that makes it a "cleanout extension" instead of a dead-end)
On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 16:10:17 GMT, Bennett Price

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Thanks for your advice. It seemed easier/better to install the valve outside the house though I didn't realize it was non-code.
I very much appreciate your help on this.
Blackbeard wrote:

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That Vent, would not meet Code. [ you can ask permission from the Inspector he would grant you permission providing there is no other way. ] Venting can be a '' May '' Law term, meaning to ' Ask. ' ''Shall'' is a must. Violating a Shall means a ' STOP WORK ORDER.' You can't even paint a wall if given one. ''Should'' means no one pays attention to that part of the code.
However it must be 6'' above the highest rim. So, run it next to the Bay window in between studs and 6 '' above the Rim of the Sink, there must be no Electrical wires in between that same studs.
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