Zero Loss Reverse Osmosis - Anyone Using One?

I am interested in buying a zero loss reverse osmosis water filter for our kitchen. Watts seems to be the only one who makes one. http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid 034720&whse¼&topnav=&catG15&hierPath3*4715*
Anyone have any experience with these, pro or con? They operate differently from regular reverse osmosis filters in that they have an A/C powered pump as part of the system.
Dick
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Dick wrote:

Or you could adapt any of the RO systems to dump the brine into the hot water supply, as Watts does. http://www.pure-earth.com/PDF/Zero-Waste-Retrofit-WP.pdf
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Where does the Excess water go.
It isnt RO unless there is waste water
RO is usualy overkill in the USA, and it removes minerals, necessary for Good health, I junked mine after full research
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m Ransley wrote:

The excess water goes into the hot water line. I considered this but wondered if it might be corrosive for potable water lines and hot water appliances.
I agree RO is usually overkill. It covers paranoia for people who are mixing baby formula, etc., and the minority with real issues such as too much sodium or arsenic. If one is on city water, it's worth noting that RO removes fluoride. My familyis on a well with undetectable amounts of fluoride, so it was a non-issue.
I do not believe the claim that removing minerals from water harms health. One gets the vast majority of these from food, not water. Imagine how much hard water one would need to drink to get adequate calcium... There was however a study which linked reduced hardness to a reduced recurrence of heart attacks in individuals (see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3396141.stm ). While I believe this merits additional study, I don't think one should jump to conclusions about health dangers of soft (or RO) water or supposed benefits of drinking hard water.
Victor
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On Sat, 19 Feb 2005 15:15:43 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

The waste water is pumped into the hot water line. How it accomplishes that I haven't figured out yet. Seems like swimming against the tide.
The unit being considered reduces Arsenic(v), Cysts, Barium, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Fluoride, Lead, Radium 226/228, Selenium, TDS, and Turbidity. In addition, bad tastes and odors, such as chlorine, can be virtually eliminated. I don't see anything on the list that my body can't do without.
Note that reverse osmosis is the filtering system used by manufacturers in creating the bottled water that seems to be as prevalent as cel phones in our society.
Dick
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Dick wrote:

That's why it has a pump. The brine flows into the hot water line, displacing some of the water contained in the water heater tank into the cold water line. Which of course then flows back into the inlet of the RO system.
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Dick wrote:

The waste water flows in a loop. It is injected into the hot water line under pressure and migrates back towards the water heater. Displaced water flows out of the cold water inlet of the water heater through the cold water line and back to the RO system. Of course, if you never use any of the hot water (i.e. in a shower, to wash dishes, etc.) then eventually the RO system will start to receive previously processed waste water at it's inlet, and that will cause the RO membranes to have a shortened life. But for most practical purposes the 'zero waste' system should work fine.
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Condensation :)
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message

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Yes where does it go, or does it go down the drain?
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On Sat, 19 Feb 2005 18:31:38 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

It definitely doesn't go down the drain. That's why it's called "Zero Waste."
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