Z-Medica QuikClot Emergency Blood Loss Stopper

Z-Medica QuikClot Emergency Blood Loss Stopper http://tinyurl.com/lbz72e (sorry about the bad link, last send.)
QuikClot is in use with the Marines and Army as a major component of their new Field First Aid Kits. Proven in plenty of tests, it has been saving lives on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan. QuikClot is a temporary traumatic wound treatment that accelerates coagulation of moderate to severe wounds, including high-volume venous and arterial bleeding. This inexpensive packet can prevent death from excessive loss of blood and hemorrhagic shock in the critical minutes before the Medic arrives. This is the full 3.5 oz. Pack for major events. Developed by Z-Medica, it is easily applied by military, police, fire, rescue and other non-medical personnel. Every home, auto, emergecny services person should have this product available for rapid use. Working at the molecular level, the highly porous QuikClot attracts and adsorbs the smaller water molecules, leaving the larger clotting factor and platelet molecules concentrated in the wound. This forms a powerful clot that stays in place until the patient can be moved to medical attention. QuikClot stops bleeding when poured in the injury in combination with direct pressure. FDA approved for external use, the medium-sized non-allergenic zeolite granules are completely inert, making it safe to leave in the wound until the victim is transported to a medical facility where it is removed by irrigation. QuikClot is easily and safely applied with only minimal instruction. Literally anyone can apply QuikClot to a wounded, bleeding victim without fear of improper handling of victims. Or, it can be self-administered. QuikClot comes in a sterile, compact, waterproof, single use, long shelf life package. Instructions are on the pouch
Price: $28.99 each
------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links
<*> To visit your group on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PracticalSurvival3 /
<*> Your email settings: Individual Email | Traditional
<*> To change settings online go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PracticalSurvival3/join (Yahoo! ID required)
<*> To change settings via email: mailto: snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com mailto: snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com
<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to: snipped-for-privacy@yahoogroups.com
<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to: http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now I see this, yes, this is excellent for TRAUMATIC, external wounds. Probably a really good lifesaver under the above circumstances. As I said in a previous reply, when one's INR gets too high, INTERNAL bleeding is most likely a problem, not bleeding from shaving, or a scratch. Better to keep a real good check on your INR (home tests) and to get a vitamin K injection from a professional when it gets too high. A stroke ain't fun!!
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it's induced by warfarin, Vitamin K injections are a sort of last resort. Talk to your doctor.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Internal bleeding is like seeping. It has many more sources than say a laceration, therefore is very difficult to stop. It can be microscopic times XXXXX sites.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It can also be much worse bleeding than seeping. If that's in the brain it's called a hemorrhagic stroke.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My guess is that an internal bleeding situation protocol would be an admit to the hospital followed by IV treatment. And some investigation to find the cause of the bleeding, which may or may not be stoppable, but maybe just controllable................ Just a guess from this hypochondriacal long term medical subject..........
Former premed student. Then I found you had to deal with blood, smelly gook, and whiny people, sooooo ...........
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/5/2011 12:12 PM, Steve B wrote:

people. I looove retirement!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 4, 10:43 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

The smaller packets are more likely to be useful in most situations. It would be best to have a number of smaller packets rather than a single large one. I read an account where a parent came downstairs to see what the yelling was about and a kid had cut off the tip of their finger. Popped a 1 oz packet on the severed finger and the bleeding just stopped. A dandy thing to keep the inside of your car clean while driving to the emergency room.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Now I see this, yes, this is excellent for TRAUMATIC, external wounds.

Han, over the last ten years, I have had countless INR's. Some by finger prick, and some by drawing about an ounce of blood. You refer to home test INR's. Can you provide any more info? I asked about it once at the Dr.'s office for a finger prick machine, and they said they were $1800 per tester.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

I DAGS'ed for INR home test and <http://www.inrselftest.com/content/ came up.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

Thanks. I have printed the app, and will proceed.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.