Yet another toilet flange question


Hey guys,
Usually we hear "Ive added some kind of flooring now my flange is too low, what can I do?". I've got the opposite question now...go figure, tis the way my projects seem to go!
Gutting a bath, 1st floor. The original floor was 4 layers. Got the joists, on top of that 3/4x8 planking, on top of that I had 3/4 ply, on top of that I had 1/4 luan, then tile on top of that.
Ripping out everything down to the 3/4x8 planks. Plan on toping that with 3/4 ply, then 1/4" underlayment, then vinyl. This is going to put the flange about 1/8" to 1/4" higher that the flooring.
Seems like I got a couple of options.
1, Add another layer of 1/4" underlayment. 2, Just add an extra bit of 1/4" under the flange so it's supported. 3, Cut out the cast, go with PVC. Obviously not a choice I'm particularly fond of. Current flange is almost 50 years old, but looks clean as heck, very surprised at how good it looks.
I guess my question is if I choose option 2 will the flange being higher than the floor affect the toilet being secure? Looking at the toilet it appears that the part that goes in to the flange is a bit recessed than the base which sits on the floor.
Ideas, thoughts? Thanks, -Brian
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This is going to put the flange

First thing I would do is look at the bottom of your toilet. Usually the flange will fit completely within the base, and the outflow will sit inside the flange so I don't see a problem.
Try setting the toilet base over the flange and if it sits flush to your floor with out rocking you are good to go. All I see is that you might have to trim a little more than usual off the threaded part of the tee bolts so you can get the nut covers on but that is not really a problem.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

I agree with Roger on this. Do not disturb the cast iron work.
You really should have at least 3/8" or so of clearance from the top of the flange to the bottom of the bowl. That's the space the wax will be squished into. If it's too thin, there is a much greater chance that the seal won't last. You might also consider one of the "rubber" seals available now instead of wax.
Jim
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If the 'wax clearance' is limited, go to a Fernco Waxless Seal. Actually, after replacing a toilet last summer using one, I will never again use a wax seal.
Harry K
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LOL, me neither! I should raise it up a couple more inches and make it a real throne! <G>
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partial board. I would also leave a small gap( 1") in the dap ( caulking) at the back of the toilet so is you do ever have a problem even after a while the water will have an escape and you will see it running out, might save you a future floor repair.
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I don't know if you mentioned the type of flooring you were going to put down?
If you're doing tile, put down the 3/4 subfloor, then 1/2" backerboard (I like Hardibacker), then the tile. That should work out quite close to the 1-1/2" total thickness (depending on the tile thickness, of course).
If you're doing vinyl, just lay a second layer of 3/4" plywood (or 1/2" ply and 1/4" underlayment).
Anthony
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