Yellow Jackets

Got a nest of them in the back yard where I need to dump grass clippings and leaves. What would be the best ways to make them wish to move elsewhere?
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They just keep coming in my back door and I can't find the next. Luckily it's getting so cold that they'll all be dead soon.
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If there are some clippimgs already there, set a match to it. They'll leave soon enough....
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Red Neckerson wrote:

Don't step on the nest, or you will be in it. And don't disturb it, or yellow jackets will pursue (which wasps do not do).
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http://www.santarosa.edu/lifesciences/control.htm
HTH
-Frank
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spray them with WD-40. i use to have about 20 nests around an old trailer. now it's a rare sight to see a yellow jacket in my yard.
--
lampy





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<< spray them with WD-40. >>
That's unbelieveably cruel. The WD-40 causes them to slide off their perches and break legs and wings. Just put an open jar of honey further out in the woods and they'll go after it. Soon they'll be too fat to fly and the nest will disappear. That's the theory,at least. Not verified or substantiated in any way. YMMV
Joe
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Several days ago I discovered yellow jackets nesting in some corner channel vinyl siding. I sprayed the opening with Wasp/Hornet killer, and watched. After 5 minutes a huge yellow jacket emerged, probably the queen, and she took off. The next day yellow jackets were still hovering around the opening and I sprayed the hole again, and then again the following day. After 4 sprayings, the hornets are now gone. Tough guys! Careful, hornets are easily agitated and will swarm.
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wrote:

They will continue to hatch out and re-appear for awhile, from my experience.
Bob
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Spray (soak) the nest with Outdoor Raid, Spider Fighter, or some other suitable industrial strength stuff - why mess around? Do this after sundown when all the bugs are home. They check in, but don't check out. If you agitate one yellow jacket, it will release a pheromone that says STING! and they'll all be after you. BUT - They can't see you in the dark..

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But if they are dug in so deep that this doesn't work, call a professional.
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I agree about calling a pro in that case. altho... I've never seen a yellow jacket nest "dug in deep" - usually they are stuck under eaves or overhangs of a building (or large machinery). Once the nest is neutralized after dark, it can be removed and burned before the rest of them hatch. Don't try to burn it while it's still attached to the eaves or the fire dept will be paying a visit.... bug spray is quite flammable.
I HAVE seen and tangled with an underground nest of strange fuzzy large honey-bee shaped critters that came boiling out of the ground and stung me 6 times before I could get outta there. That was in 1971 (before Africanized bees) and was in Minnesota. I still don't know what they were, exactly.

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