www.waterheaterrescue.com -- any good?

While looking at options for replacing our Ruud water heater, whose 5-yr warranty expired 6 years ago (and I'm still trying to figure out if it needs to be replaced at all yet), I came across
www.waterheaterrescue.com
I guess the most controversial point is his recommendation to buy a water heater with a 6-yr warranty, then upgrade the anode (or add a second one), replace a straight dip tube by a curved one, etc.
Does this make any sense?
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

His advice is basically good. I question the statement that aluminum and magnesium anodes exacerbate the formation of hydrogen sulfide. My experience is that magnesium is preferable to aluminum for anodes, but it may depend on the critter responsible, bacteria or archaea. Also while adding hydrogen peroxide will attenuate the critter population don't forget that hydrogen peroxide and copper are not too compatible.
Boden
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Also be sure to balance the cost of adding an anode against the increased purchase price of a 12yr. warranty tank (which likely has two anodes already installed.) It might only cost a little more to just get the 12 yr. tank and then you don't have to modify it before installing, and you get the benefit of the 12 yr. warranty. I have no opinion on curved dip tubes, not having tried them. I *have* replicated the drain valve setup that they sell several times, and agree with them 110% that the drain valves that come with most new water heaters suck. I will not have another water heater without a ball valve replacing the stock spigot. Even on the one water heater that I had that had a brass spigot, the connection for the handle was non-standard, so I couldn't replace the handle when it stripped, and the rubber sealing washer folded up when I opened it so it wouldn't seal again. The plastic ones - just awful. One flake of sediment and they'd never close again. Add ball valve - no problems.
when you get your new tank just get in the habit of checking the anode (s) every two years or so. (I flush the sediment out of mine every fall, and write the date on the side in Sharpie. I also note whenever I check the anode - if I didn't do it this year I'll do it next year.) So long as they are still mostly there but not obviously passivated, you can sleep securely.
nate
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you have too much spare time on your hands., new tanks are pretty cheap, i just install and forget about it for 8 years, then buy a new one after shopping around. way better than emergency on clodest day of year with houseguests coming
I prefer 50 gallong 75K BTU tank for faster recovery and capacity. next tank will likey be 75 gallons, they appear to have quit making 50 gallon tanks in 75K BTU model
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Nah, I'm just cheap. replacing my water heater would be a major Big Deal, plus I don't trust the 60 year old gas shutoff valve, so I'd have to call in the gas man to hook it up, don't want to blow up my house and then have the insurance adjuster laugh at me and call me a dumb shit. Just waiting until I have a little more scratch together, then I'll have gas man come and replace WH and replace all three shutoff valves (WH, dryer, and furnace)
nate
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Nah, I'm just cheap. replacing my water heater would be a major Big Deal, plus I don't trust the 60 year old gas shutoff valve, so I'd have to call in the gas man to hook it up, don't want to blow up my house and then have the insurance adjuster laugh at me and call me a dumb shit. Just waiting until I have a little more scratch together, then I'll have gas man come and replace WH and replace all three shutoff valves (WH, dryer, and furnace)
nate
You should have to shut off valves, one at the heater, the main at the meter. If you shut off the meter replace the one at the heater while at it.
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That's the plan. And I would replace the ones for the furnace and clothes dryer at the same time (they're on the same run and within a couple feet of each other, and replacing the one for the furnace would require removing the pipe feeding the water heater anyway.) Not being a trained pipe fitter, I have confidence that I theoretically know how to do it, but having worked in construction for a number of years, I'm also a little squirrely about liability. I do a lot of stuff myself, but stuff that goes boom (and/or can kill you through asphyxiation,) well...
nate
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you have too much spare time on your hands., new tanks are pretty cheap, i just install and forget about it for 8 years, then buy a new one after shopping around. way better than emergency on clodest day of year with houseguests coming
I prefer 50 gallong 75K BTU tank for faster recovery and capacity. next tank will likey be 75 gallons, they appear to have quit making 50 gallon tanks in 75K BTU model
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If you have hot water heat, consider an indirect fired heater. Very efficient, especially with a cold start boiler. First hour ratings for a 40 gallon are 195 gallons (depending on model)
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forced air here, its nice fast response when wanted
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