"worn out" toilet

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Or go for white vinegar down the overflow tube to get the rim holes. Let it set in there overnight every so often. I use a .22 caliber gun- cleaning brush for the rim holes if they seem to need cleaning if the vinegar doesn't help. Remember that vinegar is an acid, just not as aggressive as others.
Ashton Crusher wrote:

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Question. Does the water flow slowly from the tank to the bowl?
Or, does the bowl fill up rapidly, and then drain slowly?
These are two different symptoms, and indicate two different problems.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormy, tell the OP to use stool softener.

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pete wrote: "I have been told my toilet is"worn out" and that is why the wa ter flushes so slowly......that the porcelian is worn out.................have not heard of that before......suggestion by a plumber was to pour dishwashing soap in bowl every couple of days.....would improve but not much ANy ideas??? Toilet might be 20 years old"
I *thought* this was a repair forum, according to it's name, but anywho...
One thing nobody mentioned on here: The possibility of mineral build-up in side the rim jets of the toilet bowl itself. This is especially true with a very old fixture or if your local water supply is particularly hard. A s mall wire brush might be used to carefully clear out those rim jets and res tore some of the original flushing power.
Using a plumber's snake to clear any drain obstacles, as mentioned earlier on here, is common sense, but should not require pulling up the toilet.
Finally, make sure your tank is refilling up to the full line inside, not 2 inches or so beneath it, so you are using the specified water amount per f lush.
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replying to pete, shutterbug wrote:

I was told the same thing today. Apparently, the water is forced into the drain so that the flushing action can take place. Carbon build-up can slow that forced water stream, neutralizing the flushing action. Go figure.
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On 11/25/2015 12:44 AM, shutterbug wrote:

Toilets can deteriorate. Under the rim is a series of holes for the water to come into the bowl for the flush. Over time, depending on your water, they will get plugged and performance slowly degrades. The trap can build up too.
If you are going to replace the toilet, get the comfort height. Easier on the knees as you get older. There are some very good toilets that are reasonably priced from Kohler, Amer. Standard, Toto
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| > I have been told my toilet is"worn out" and that is why the water | > flushes so slowly......that the porcelian is worn | > out.................have not heard of that before......suggestion by a | > plumber was to pour dishwashing soap in bowl every couple of | > days.....would improve but not much | > ANy ideas??? Toilet might be 20 years old | | | I was told the same thing today. Apparently, the water is forced into the | drain so that the flushing action can take place. Carbon build-up can | slow that forced water stream, neutralizing the flushing action. Go | figure. |
Sounds to me like an urban legend, maybe perpetrated by dish soap makers. :) Try filling a rough wooden bowl with water and then tipping it. Do you find that the water suddenly acts colloidal, resisting tipping out of the bowl because of friction? I doubt that will happen.
Before the 1.6 gallon flush law it was common not to even glaze the inner s-tube section of toilets. (I can't recall the name for that.)
On the other hand, more modern toilets have been designed with surprisingly powerful flushes. So maybe the person who told you that yours is anemic is simply comparing it to theirs. If it works then it doesn't need to be fixed. It certainly doesn't need more dish soap added to sewer waste that then has to be treated.
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shutterbug posted for all of us...

I don't think it's "carbon buildup" but rather mineral buildup. A good product which I use and recommended here was Worx. It does... DAGS as to application and usage. You may save $$$ having to replace the terlet vs the work.
--
Tekkie

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