working with pure acetone in the home

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question, I own a home and just started renting a room out to a friend. I have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is flammable. my roomate just told me it was fingernail polish remover (which women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).
thanks
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On Friday, October 12, 2012 10:40:36 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

From Yahoo answers:
"Acetone is only mildly toxic, but is highly volatile and very flammable. Acetone vapors are heavier than air and will travel along the counter top or floor. If they encounter a source of ignition - flame or spark, for example - the flame will flash back to the source, possibly causing a larger fire or explosion. Acetone should be used indoors only with adequate ventilation."
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On Friday, October 12, 2012 10:46:03 PM UTC-6, Roy wrote:

what do you mean adequate ventilation? does that mean the doors and windows should be open when he's working? it's a fairly large room he's working in (probably 10 feet by 25 feet...it's a kitchen/dining room/family room....but it's all kinda one big room). it's starting to get pretty cold where I live so that may not be an option. I'd like to tell him to take it outside or search for some other chemical that will do that job that isn't flamable. I just don't want to come off as unreasonable as a landlord (and roomate).
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On 10/13/2012 1:00 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is flammable. my roomate just told me it was fingernail polish remover (which women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).

Acetone vapors are heavier than air and will travel along the counter top or floor. If they encounter a source of ignition - flame or spark, for example - the flame will flash back to the source, possibly causing a larger fire or explosion. Acetone should be used indoors only with adequate ventilation."

should be open when he's working? it's a fairly large room he's working in (probably 10 feet by 25 feet...it's a kitchen/dining room/family room....but it's all kinda one big room). it's starting to get pretty cold where I live so that may not be an option. I'd like to tell him to take it outside or search for some other chemical that will do that job that isn't flamable. I just don't want to come off as unreasonable as a landlord (and roomate).

Well..........how much is he using and how long does it take? One cotton ball dampened with acetone per day? Open container all day long? If he is constructing something indoors, can he not take the acetone outdoors, remove the ink from all the tubing, let it dry, then bring it in?
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you might suggest he try goof off or goo gone, both are designed to remove all sorts of nasties. available at places like home depot and lowes
a friends 3 year old used markers to paint a newly painted room, goo gone took all the marks off.
right after that her hubby was playing with her son and spilled a can of contact cement on the kitchens vinyl floor....... a week later i asked did you try goo gone? she hadnt but did and the you would never know contact cement had spilled there....
a mild abrasive like a scothchbrite pad normally used to clean pans may help remove the printing...
my friend now gives a container of goo gone and goof off to every new baby shower mom. she reports most have thanked her.
that plastic tubing is cheap and may be available without the printing.....
at least he could do large quanties outdoors on nice days.
so once a month do a big bunch and use as needed
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I wouldn't be overly concerned by either, but Goo Gone is more toxic than acetone.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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On Saturday, October 13, 2012 8:45:10 AM UTC-6, Larry W wrote:

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That's what I was thinking. If I were doing it in my own house and used one cotton ball on two feet of tubing twice a year, I wouldn't worry much about doing it inside. If it's 20 ft of tubing and once a week, I'd do that outside for sure, because for one thing, I don't want to be breathing those vapors for hours later. And that's for me doing it myself. With a renter wouldn't put up with it because I don't know how smart, careful, respectful of my property the renter is going to be. I would have visions of the can of acetone spilling all over the place.....
Why can't the renter do enough tubing all at once outside to last for many months?
And is he using anything else in this operation, like plastic glues, etc? Any of that kind of stuff, I'm OK with a one time thing, but not with a regular use in support of a business.
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On Friday, October 12, 2012 11:00:58 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

==
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Tell him to get a "Menda" dispenser. That should reduce evaporation considerable, and eliminate the rather significant chance of a spill.
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On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 21:40:36 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is

women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).

I have some but not much experience, and no academic knowledge.
I think it depends on the details. How many instances of the stamped number are on each piece of tubing? If the tubing is one foot long it might be one or two, but if it's 10 feet long, 10 or 20. How many pieces of tubing.
I'd guess, guess, that it takes about as much acetone to remove one finger's worth of nail polish as one instance of the number and girls do 10 fingers at a time. OTOH do they use Q-tips, which hold a lot less than a cotton swab? I forget. It's been 30 years since I had a girlfriend who used to remove her nailpolish, it seemed like every day, in front of me.
When I use acetone, I close the bottle as soon as I wet the cotton, because it will evaporate right out of the bottle, and so I won't spill it. Does he do that? I think I would have him keep his bottle, esp. when it's open, in something like a dishpan, the kind of rubber pan as big as two loaves of whiite bread side by side. Then if he spills it, he can take the whole pan outside, pour as much as he can back in t he bottle and spill the rest on the ground., I have used dishpans this way.
Maybe he can put the tubing in there when he's done with it and have it rest outside too, although there may be no point to that . The acetone probably has evaporated within a minute, so there is nothing to dry. .
Maybe for the whole project he could go his bedroom and close the door and open the window for the 15? minutes it takes to do all this? If you don't smell it in the rest of the house, you'll know it's not getting there. He could do it on the bed with a dishpan to hold the bottle of acetone. Check a part of the pan to see if acetone dissolves.
Although of course if you do smell it and stop smelling it, it may well only mean your nose sensor for that smell is tired. How long does it take until a nose stops sensing a smell, 15 minutes? Isn't that why a person doesn't know when he has bad breath or body odor?
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wrote:

have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is

women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).

acetone at all. Most now use ethyl acetate instead. Cutex regular nail polish remover IS 70% acetone.
On the other hand, a "kinder gentler" remover contains: Butyl Acetate, Ethyl Acetate, Isopropyl Alcohol, Dibutyl Adipate, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange)Oil, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Benzophenone-3, Cl 26100 (D&C #17).
All are still extremely flammable.
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On Oct 13, 5:40am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetone
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question, I own a home and just started renting a room out to a friend. I have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is flammable. my roomate just told me it was fingernail polish remover (which women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).
*Just read the labeling on the manufacturers container to see how nasty acetone can be. It is a solvent and it can damage your floor finish. Newspapers are not adequate protection. Nail polish remover is a diluted version of acetone. You really do need ventilation when working with this stuff. It evaporates very quickly into the air, but where does it go after that. You could be exposing yourself to acetone vapors and not even know it. A garage would be a healthier choice to work with it.
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 06:16:38 -0400, "John Grabowski"

Not safe at all. I would put a stop to it.
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On 10/13/2012 12:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is flammable. my roomate just told me it was fingernail polish remover (which women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).

Material safety data sheet may help:
http://fscimage.fishersci.com/msds/00140.htm
Main concern with acetone is flammability as with most other organic solvents.
I would not worry about small amount of vapors as it is not very toxic and OSHA allowable exposure levels are high.
The concern voiced about its solvent power is true and it could attack paints and finishes.
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On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 21:40:36 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. All correct. A little on a swab is probably not going to do anything at all. At a minimum though, I'd have a window open. To avoid spills, go outside and pour off some into a small container of a few ounces instead of the quart or gallon he is now using. Be careful where you store it too.
If you have a pilot light on a heater, be sure to stay far away from it, don't smoke, etc. Open two windows and have a fan blowing in one to force the air out the other. Remember, it is the fumes that are dangerous.
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The OP did mention "pint bottle". Overall, it can be done safely. But, the news papers on the floor don't much impress me.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

All correct. A little on a swab is probably not going to do anything at all. At a minimum though, I'd have a window open. To avoid spills, go outside and pour off some into a small container of a few ounces instead of the quart or gallon he is now using. Be careful where you store it too.
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 08:34:37 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Dont worry about it. Jesus used to drink pure acetone. This is what caused him to hallucinate and make him believe that he was God. If you love the Mormon cult Jesus, you MUST drink acetone to be just like him.
--
Destroy The Mormon Cult

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The situation as you describe, sounds dangerous. I'd not want that going on, in my home. Yes, acetone is the ingredient in nail polish remover. But, it only takes one mistake.
When I was a teen, there was a fire call. The pharmacist at the small town pharmacy had dropped a jug of acetone, next to a space heater. Some how there was a fire. He tried fire extinguisher, and finally bailed out. The FD came, but by this time the the pharmacy was heavily involved. They were carrying out charred stuff to the dumpster, for weeks after that. The place never reopened.
I had my black and white camera there, but the focuss was off. I took some pictures, but they didn't come out very well with the focuss set to two feet. Ah, well.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
question, I own a home and just started renting a room out to a friend. I have been helping him sell some gadgets online (he makes them himself). he purchased hard plastic tubing to make the items (it's pretty small tubing). he buys the tubing in bulk. he uses pure acetone to remove some manufacturing numbers that are stamped on one side of the tubing. he uses a cotton swab and dips it in a pint bottle of pure acetone and then uses the swab to blot out the stamped number. I think that's great. however, he's doing it on my living room floor which concerns me. and what concerns me even more, it he spreads out some newspapers to work on and lets the area of the plastic tube dry (the area where he blotted out the stamped number). is this safe? sorta safe? or not safe at all? and when I say safe, I mean safe on the living room floor of someone's home. I really thought laying newspapers under it is a stupid idea. I know nothing about pure acetone other that I read it is flammable. my roomate just told me it was fingernail polish remover (which women use all the time in the house) so it should be no big deal to use in the house. all responses are much appreciated. I asked him to take it outside, but he told me he would be extra careful. it's starting to get cold where I live (that may be one of the reasons he doesn't want to take it outside).
thanks
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