Working with Galvanized Iron Pipe in Cement

There's a shed built against one side of our house we'd like removed. Our problem is that inside the shed run two three-foot pipes out of the ground that are joined together with PVC connections. One is a supply line and the other leads to the rest of the house. These used to be hooked up to a water softener. Both pipes are galvanized iron and emerge from a concrete "curb" in the ground on the side of the house. I've crawled under the house and the pipes are inaccessable.
I'd like to join these two pipes closer to the ground so there will be less of an eyesore when the shed is removed. Being that the pipes themselves emerge from concrete, and the only threads I have to work with are three feet above the ground, how can this be done? Is there a tool that will thread the pipe in it's current location? If at all possible I'd like to do this myself.
Thanks in advance for any help.
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Yes, it is called a pipe die. Has a handle and rachet. You need clearance around the pipe of a couple of inches. You simple cut the pipe off square, remove the burr from cutting it, if you used a hacksaw. If you used a pipe cutter (like a tubing cutter, but bigger), there is no burr. I bet you don't have room to swing the pipe cutter, however. I think you can rent pipe dies.
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professorpaul wrote:

To the OP: You can probably buy what you need from Harbor Freight which on sale will probably be less that the price of renting a pipe threader.
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alert old galvanized may and mostly likey is detoriated from the inside as well as outside, espically if underground.
be prepared to replace whatver pipe ends up being involved to find good pipe.
A good friend had a minor drip and ended up replumbing his house
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alert old galvanized may and mostly likey is detoriated from the inside as well as outside, espically if underground.
be prepared to replace whatver pipe ends up being involved to find good pipe.
A good friend had a minor drip and ended up replumbing his house
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If it were my job I'd cut it off just a little higher than you might want it. That way if you mess up, you can try again a few times (after re-cutting). And if you keep messing up you can call the plumber before it's too short to redo.
-Tim
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localhost wrote:

The other posts indicate how to thread the pipe after you cut it. One thing that is not mentioned is that when you cut these off close to the concrete, there will be no more flex in the pipes. You will probably have to install a union in your pvc connection in order to be able to tie everything together.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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