Woodstove Steamers?

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Well?
A combustion air supply that dumps into the room vs the stove itself can bring in lots of dry outdoor air and let more humid house air leave via the chimney.

Run it with a humidistat...

Ignorance is bliss :-)

An outdoor vapor barrier with soggy insulation and rotting studs? :-)

You might get a blower door test or do more airsealing on your own, with a window exhaust fan and a $60 Kestrel 1000 air velocity meter.
Nick
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On Nov 16, 8:03 am, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

You are coming across as a typical egg-head scientist. While your 'theory' is correct, in pratice it ain't either practical or even real. If you are worried about a an extra 1000 btu out of many thousands... especially since those 1000 btu are excess anyhow in most cases when heating with wood.
Reminds me of the guy who pointed out that science had solved the GW due to CO2 problem by treating the atmosphere which allowed the excess co2 to be absorbed rapidly in the oceans. I pointed out that what works in the lab ain't realistic when applied to thosands of cubic kilometers of atmosphere.
Harry K
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You are coming across as a person who cannot spell :-)

I disagree.
Nick
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So air quality is based only on humidity? OK, got it. Dry air is clean air.
Hmm... You better show me the calculations on that, and can you provide the current acceptable levels of various particulates in the average American household? I want to be sure I understand all the processes involved so I can make an informed decision.

Ignorance is providing answers that do not apply to the question.
I didn't ask what was wrong with my house or woodstove that caused the air to be dry. I asked for a source of small woodstove steamers.
It would be easier to just not use the woodstove than to apply all your suggestions.
Anthony
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We use a common aluminum large kettle - not attactive but practical. The 6" limitation really cuts down on options - can't see a very large capacity anything fitting that. Just have to keep on top of filling whatever you use. We originally tryed using a whistling teakettle - that lasted only a few days due to the annoyance factor and it wouldn't hold enough water.
Drawback of pots/pans/bowls/trays whatever for that is the minerals in the water. The water evaporates and leaves them behind encrusting the container. Thus a clear container will soon look very ugly unless cleaned regulary and that stuff doesn't come off easily. Our kettle has been in operation for over 20 years and has a constant thin layer of minerals - as it thickens it tends to flake off. My BIL in Canada had so much sulphur in his water that his kettle would build a _thick_ layer in one season.
Harry K
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A simple tea kettle will do! (Not the whistling kind...)
"HerHusband" wrote in message

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wrote:

Most hardware stores sell black cast iron kettles made for this purpose. $15 or thereabouts.
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On Wed, 14 Nov 2007 16:57:57 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Been doing wood stoves for years... the evap rate for anything on top of the stove is very slow. I don't think it makes any appreciable difference in humidity. You'd do better by hanging the wash on a rack in front of the stove to dry overnight - you save on drying costs and humidify your house at the same time.
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Yet another option: on bringing wood indoors, stack it up with butts facing the stove sides for a few days. Moisture is released into house, and wood burns better and more cleanly. IME, no matter how it's stored outside.
I made a few simple small racks to support such stacks, and place them a couple of feet from stove sides, so wood temps do not exceed 150 deg F.
Do NOT EVER allow any flammables near stove to get so hot that you cannot hold your hand on side facing stove.
After a couple of days, move the wood farther away. YMWV.
FWIW, woodstoves do NOT dry the air. RH may drop, as with any other heating appliance. Biggest reason for drying you point to is infiltration of outside air with low absolute humidity.
John
HerHusband wrote:

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"HerHusband" wrote

Interesting! I'm used to seeing ones that are much bigger and a copper kettle.
Here's an idea. It *might* break from the heat but it won't hurt anything if it does. If you have access to a sort of inexpensive asian grocery type place, they have those little ceramic teapots. They are actually quite sturdy under a brazier and can look very charming. Lots of color choices, you should be able to get one for 10$ or less. I think they will work as they generally only have a problem with rapid temp changes. For 20$, you might find a copper one (wont rust). My other ideas lead to terracotta sort of. The lower bowls you set under planters, this time filled partway with some black smoothe rocks?
Yard sales might have all those items. Careful on metal as you do not want rust (solid copper or brass is fine though).
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Just be aware that copper or brass kettles may be soldered. If they run dry, the solder may melt!
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There are a bunch of them here http://www.plowhearth.com/category.asp?section_id 02&department050&search_typetegory&search_value39&cm_val=&cm_pos=&cm_type Karen

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