woodburning stove for office/shop

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UL does a heck of a lot more than only electrical things any more. Specific to this discussion from the UL website: UL can evaluate gas-fired or solid-fuel fired hearth product appliances to the applicable U.S., Canadian and global requirements. This includes factory-built fireplaces, fireplace stoves, room heaters, pellet stoves and fireplace inserts. We can evaluate gas-only fired units, solid-fuel units, or units that use a combination of gas and other heat sources such as wood, coal or other solid-fuel. We also evaluate outdoor gas or solid-fuel appliances such as fireplaces or log sets.
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Jules wrote:

The EPA is part of the US government, mostly curbing pollution. UL, "Underighters Laboratories" is a private business that tests and approves mostly electrical devices if they are safe. Many electrical products are sold without the UL approval and this is perfectly legal.
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"Jules" wrote in message

EPA would be required by state law or local law and the local building inspector would be the one looking for this.
Then UL stands for Underwriters Laboratories. An "underwriter" is an insurance company. So UL inspects things for insurance companies. And if there is a UL label, then the insurance company can be assured the product will not cause a fire (if installed properly). And that there will probably not be any claim from you for damages resulting from a fire.
Thus they can collect your monthly insurance premium and not have to pay anything out! The insurance company is then happy!
Here are the requirements for Oregon (for example) about the EPA label... http://www.deq.state.or.us/aq/burning/woodstoves/buysell.htm
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Bill wrote:

But if you build a small fire in a large stove too often, your flu pipe/chimney will not run hot enough and will build up creosote much much faster creating a dangerous situation. A chimney fire just waiting to happen.
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Seems a straight vertical flu pipe would be best?
Straight up from the stove through the roof? vs a pair of 90 deg. transitions (out wall, then back up).
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But in modern (double-wall) steel chimneys chimney fires are seldom dangerous. (I have known firemen recommend them as the best way to remove creosote from a chimney.) Points of danger are: 1 -- obsolete chimneys that do not meet current safety codes; 2 -- the release from the chimney-top of burning material that may fall onto the roof, adjacent buildings, dry treetops etc.
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Carlsbad Springs
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Don Phillipson wrote:

Will this stove have double wall stove pipe?
As far as purposely creating a chimney fire, yes I did it all the time up in PA. Every few days to a week, after it was good and hot I'd open the door and the flames went up the flue and the very thin layer of creosote was burnt off. After 2 years I had someone out to clean it and he said it's about as clean as it will ever get. Oh, and I even burnt a lot of pine wood scraps. Run them hot and they stay clean.
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No one has ever come out to check my stove or ask for a permit as they are not required here.
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It's been a while since I've looked, but they used to sell kits for turning a 55 gallon drum into a wood stove. Much lower cost than a new stove. Is it the highest quality wood stove you can buy? Is it a beautiful addition to your home? No - but might be a good way to test the concept. You can line with firebrick to extend the life. The large surface area of the drum actually does help with heat output and efficiency. Put together right, it can be fairly airtight too. But, can't say I have actually done it. -- H
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wrote:

http://cylinderstoves.com/
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Nope, that's not it. I am talking about a kit where you get the door, legs, and chimney stub, and attach them yourself to your own drum. For example, (no endorsement as to quality or price, just here's a website with a picture that shows what I mean): http://www.northlineexpress.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=5VZ-BK150E&source=froogle&kw=5VZ-BK150E
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Heathcliff wrote:

http://www.northlineexpress.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=5VZ-BK150E&source=froogle&kw=5VZ-BK150E Unfortunately, they are probably not EPA certified, and thus may be illegal to install.
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Heathcliff wrote:

They still sell the kits, I think at Tractor Supply. I had a friend with one out in a room off the garage where we hung out. They are excellent for fast heat! And I was surprised at how long he used it with the same 55 gallon drum. I wanted to put one in my garage for that reason, it was FAST! I could do it, even legally, but if my garage burnt down my insurance wouldn't pay.
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A neat idea is a wood burning furnace that sits outside. This heats a water jacket and then you pump the water to a heat exchanger in the office/shop.
Inside no soot, no bugs and you can stack the wood close to the furnace instead of lugging it inside and lugging the ashes back out.
You might also look into a heat pump.
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Roger Shoaf
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

Completely illegal in Washington state.

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