Wood plank sizes

My patio overhang has two posts that bear some of the roof weight and, from what I can tell, these look to be constructed of probably an iron pipe enclosed squarely by two lengths of 5 1/4" wide board on two sides and two lengths of 3 3/4 " wide board on the opposite sides (making a box around the pole.
The lower portion of the 3 3/4" wide boards is rotting due to its contact (and water) with the patio blue stone. I want to cut out about 2 feet of both planks of this width board and replace it with new board (and prime and paint). Unfortunately, this is an odd sized board width. Typical board widths (lets say a 1x4x6 board) has the width of 3 1/2", not 3 3/4". I have no idea where to obtain such a width board. What am I missing here? Did the original builder/carpenter cut down vertically (length-wise) a larger width board to make this odd sized 3 3/4" board?
Now what?
Thanks. Walter
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on 8/26/2007 7:57 PM Walter Cohen said the following:

If anyone sees the other response from me, disregard it. I completely missed the 2' cut off part. Yes, the planks you are referring to are cut to width (ripped) by a table saw or other saw. Depending upon how long (high) these posts are, you will probably be better off ripping two 1" x 10" x (whatever length) to the correct widths and replacing the whole box. Patching will no doubt leave seams.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I'll second that. For a simple box enclosure on a 1-story tall post, trying to patch it in will be a major PITA, and likely end up looking like crap. 1x boards aren't even that expensive. If boards are rotted, OP needs to inspect the hidden post anyway to make sure it isn't badly rusted. The new wood he puts back needs to be held off the bluestone by a standoff of some sort to keep from sucking moisture. I presume somebody (like Simpson) has U-shaped standoffs that lock together.
aem sends....
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on 8/26/2007 8:58 PM aemeijers said the following:

I have 4 boxed posts on concrete holding up an overhang on the front of my house. They box PT 4x4 supports. I boxed them in myself. I left a 1/2" gap at the bottom all around and used plastic interior floor base molding to finish off the bottom. Whatever water gets in there will seep under the plastic molding and not soak the box.
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In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2007 19:57:27 -0400, "Walter Cohen"

Use (outdoor) yellow carpenters glue to join two boards side-by-side, allow to cure 24 hours, then rip to desired width. The glue line will be stronger than the wood itself. Good rot-resistant woods include teak, white oak, cedar, cypress. Pressure-treated wood is usually too wet for glue-up or painting.
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I'll skip part of the answer and just say, a saw.
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Sun, 26 Aug 2007 19:57:27 -0400 from Walter Cohen

In the olden days, a can of tuna was 7 ounces and a 4-inch piece of lumber was 4 inches. Then tuna shrank to 6.5 ounces and 4-inch lumber to 3.75, though not at the same time. :-) Now tuna is 6.25 or 6 ounces, and 4-inch lumber is 3.5 inches.
It sounds like your supports were bought in Stage 2.
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