wood or concrete basement floor

I want to finish my basement. Headroom is not an issue as it is ten feet from the dirt floor up to the bottom of my first floor joists.
Would it be better (and or cheaper) to "build" a floor similar to my first floor floor (joists, sheathing, ...) or to pour a concrete slab. The floor covering will be carpet.
The "wood" floor I would build myself, the concrete floor I would have to pay for labor and materials.
The basement is approximately 25' x 12'. The basement walls are concrete block filled with concrete and rebar and coated with Quikwall surface bonding cement.
Jess
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I want to finish my basement. Headroom is not an issue as it is ten feet from the dirt floor up to the bottom of my first floor joists.
Would it be better (and or cheaper) to "build" a floor similar to my first floor floor (joists, sheathing, ...) or to pour a concrete slab. The floor covering will be carpet.
The "wood" floor I would build myself, the concrete floor I would have to pay for labor and materials.
The basement is approximately 25' x 12'. The basement walls are concrete block filled with concrete and rebar and coated with Quikwall surface bonding cement.
Jess
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I'd go with concrete. First I'd put down 2" of foam insulation board.
Disadvantages of wood over dirt: Rot Mold & mildew Residence for rodents Residence for insects
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I'm in Portland Oregon where the weather is mild.
If I go with concrete, what type of gravel is best for a base? 3/4" ballast, 3/4"-1/2", 3/4 minus, ... ?
Would the 2" foam insulation be of benefit in Portland?
So it would be gravel, then a vapor barrier like visqueen, then the foam board, then say 4" of concrete?
Does a slab in a basement need reinforcement (wire mesh or rebar)?
I have concrete walls in the basement. Should the floor butt up against the wall, or should there be some type of gap between the wall and the floor?
What type of expansion joints are best for a basement floor? Should it just be a cut say a 1/4" deep or should it be something like a board or divider that totally separates the 4" depth of one section of the floor from another?
Is 2500 psi concrete acceptable?
I will do all the work except the concrete. If I have the gravel, visqueen, foam board, and reinforcement all in place over the entire floor, will it be in the way when the concrete guys come in to pour? Or in other words, should I let them do part of it (say like the reinforcement) so they can do it as they go (to keep it out of the way on other parts of the floor)?
There is really no way to get a wheel barrow full of concrete UP the steep path and into my basement, so I assume that they can pump it in. How far can an "average" pumper pump?
I've heard that concrete is going up. Does $90 a yard sound right for Portland Oregon?
If I have a 400 square foot floor, what is a fair "ball park" range for a Portland Oregon concrete dude(s) to pour my floor (labor and materials)? I would guess that most contractors are experienced enough to give a fairly accurate estimate for a basement floor just by using the square footage (meaning that I could expect a rough estimate from them over the phone). Is that true?
Thanks, Jess
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jess - I would let your concrete guy make recomendations. Reinforcement is not typical in my area but a couple of cracks are. Related? My basement slab is a 'floating' slab. Perimiter was shimmed out from the wall using some foam board. Perimiter drains to a sump pump and a radon abatement system were installed before the pour. If you have radon or water you should prepare for it before the pour.
I agree that concrete is the way to go. Good pad then carpet.

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