Wood furniture repair

Hello:
I'm hoping someone can help me with this repair. I accidentally knocked over a bottle of scented oil which leaked through my runner and dissolved the finish off my dining room table. It left a pretty big spot - right down to the wood. Is there anything I should know about re-staining that area to match the rest of the table? I'm nervous to get started!
Thanks,
Stacey
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hello:
I can tell you what I did for my dining table that had some scrathces and stain that just disappeard and was left with off color whitish finish in some area.
Between using standard minwax stain and stain stick (a pencil of the stains for deep thin scratches), I was able to stain the surface and not see any whitish unstained areas. I have read that one can sand the surface to make an 'even' area to stain. I did not do it.
However, this is my personal experience and I was happy with the result. One other thing I will recommend when using stain is to make sure the area is well ventilated. Good luck. MGN
sk115 wrote:

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Go to www.refinishwizard.com forum and describe what happened, what wood is involved, where purchased if possible to provide a path to type of finish and maybe you'll get some advice.

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How big is the table, and how big is the spot? Did the oil really remove the stain, or just the top finish? If the stain is "bleached" out, it's going to be a complicated job matching the stain.
If it's just the finish coat, probably lacquer if this is a store-bought piece, you may be able to reamalgamate the finish, if the spot isn't too large. Basically, you brush the entire top of the table with lacquer thinner (sometimes diluted with a dollop or two of denatured alcohol), let it soak in a bit, then brush again, and if that doesn't look quite right repeat the process until it does. There's more to reamalgamation than that very crude description, so if you're interested I suggest looking it up online or in furniture refinishing books. I'd also suggest not trying reamalgamation unless you've done some refinishing and have time to experiment.
It may be worth while to have a professional furniture restorer do the repair. Look in the yellow pages, or call the store or manufacturer of the table, or ask moving companies who they use. It may not be as expensive as you think, and may be cost effective depending on the original cost of the table or a replacement - or maybe not -:).
--
Luke
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From your description, the oil stripped the finish right off the table. Since it is a dining room table, it will get a lot of close up looks. I suggest you have a professional on-site repairer. The color came off because almost all furniture since World War II has the color in the coatings. Your likelihood of getting an acceptable match yourself is very low since you don't indicate that you have any experience in doing this kind of work. You might consider redissolving some of the remaining finish in a process called reamalgamation but given all the different color layers, it will probably not match very well.
Good Luck.

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Baron's advice is spot-on. If the spot is any bigger than a quarter, it's just going to stick out like a sore thumb. The only way to get a good color match is to custom blend a color until it's just right. Even then, it will probably not be perfectly level with the rest of the funish. There will have to be a top-coat applied to even out the sheen.
In 1987, I hired a "pro" recommended by the furniture store to fix some deep cat scratches a dresser. He basically *painted* (as in opaque pigmented finish) then sprayed on a new coat of lacquer. The new finish did not have the original sheen of the piece.
At the time I thought that the fix was "ok" but that's all. Now I build and finish my own furniture. In retrospect, that is about the best I could expect from an on-site repair. To do better you have to completely strip/sand and refinish the top.
-Steve
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sk115 wrote:

A "pretty big" spot? Your chances of a perfect match are about nil. I would probably refinish the table top, after experimenting on the underside. What kind of wood? Color of finish?
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