Wood for porch floor

I'm having my front porch rebuilt. It has a roof, but other than a balustrade, the floor won't be covered. It has northern, eastern, and a bit of southern exposure. I live in NJ.
The builder plans to use pine (I don't know which species). Is that okay? We plan to paint it (I've heard that the paint should be an oil-based enamel--will that do?), and I will specify that the ends must be treated with a sealer and that the ends and tongues and grooves must be primed before the boards are laid. Does that sound right? Is there a more appropriate wood species?
Thanks for any help!
Anne
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Pine might be OK. It is generally a soft wood but depending on which species it may be fine (Douglas Fir?). There is also a mahogany T&G porch floor material that I like better. The boards should be free of knots and have a tight, close grain. Quatersawn is best.

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I live on a lake and even with a shaded south exposure the deck only lasted 10 years till treated came out. Get Treated at least and be sure the proper fasteners are used, I believe Stainless is the only thing the New treated wont destroy. My treated deck is now 25yrs old and fine.
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She is talking about a T&G traditional porch floor not a deck. I'm pretty sure. Good advice for a deck though.

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On 10 Sep 2004 05:56:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@angelfire.com (Anne) wrote:

If you really want to go all out in the wood protection area, after the ends are sealed and dry, have the boards dip primed before installation. It's not hard or expensive. The painter builds/buys a narrow trough equal to the length of the boards, puts in primer, dips the boards into the primer, and then backrolls off the excess. Full coverage.
As for wood species, unless it is hard pine (which is expensive) I'd go with cedar or fir.
The choice of paint is correct.
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Are you referring to Southern Yellow Pine?

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Anne wrote:

I have a porch like you describe but mine gets primarily eastern exposure with a bit of northern and southern. The floor was put in in 1960 by my grandfather and is fir as far as I can tell. It is painted with an oil base porch paint and is still in decent shape given it is 45 years old. The only protection on this porch was the paint. The northern exposure part gets the most weather damage as would be expected. I looked into replacing the floor earlier this year and it was recommended that I use fir. Pine is softer as far as I know (but I'm not an expert either).
Rob NE PA
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To those who so generously took the time to answer my questions: Thank you so much for the help. I will talk to the contractor about using a different wood, such as mahogany, cedar, or fir.
Anne
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