wood floors

Page 2 of 2  


I don't have any personal experience, but if you say so. ;-) Stacy What's-her-name <um, looks it up> London) on What Not to Wear keeps saying that if they're fit right they feel fine.

Evidence?
I think women look nice in heels but other than that have no skin in the game. Full disclosure, SWMBO doesn't wear spikes. Never has, to my knowledge (and we've been married 40 years, if that means anything ;-).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The secret to a good wiggle is to walk Indian style, placing each foot on an imaginary straight line one ahead of the other as she walks. Learned that from a runway model when I used to do portfolio work for them.
Just watched "Some Like It Hot" the other night. That MM sure had "IT" with capital letters.
Heard of a lease that specifically prohibited the occupants from wearing spike heels.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 18:39:27 -0500, Vic Smith

Pretty drastic penalty for scratching the floors, no? ;-)

Or a contractor's kid using a piece of cardboard and 5-gal can as a merry-go-round while dad is tearing out a wall. :-(

Grease does wonders for the paint job, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 Jun 2011 16:45:05 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

hehe.
That'll work.

Only problem I had with grease was when he smudged up the bathroom sink and shower. Don't know how he managed to miss everything else. After a couple times I laid down the law. Already had plenty of GoJo and rags in the garage, Made him recaulk the entire tub/shower too, so it was win-win. Then I bought him a couple pairs of good coveralls. A couple sizes too large so you can drop them and step out of them easy. He's good now. Almost. A few days ago he came in from doing some brake work. Clean hands and freshly laundered coveralls. When he left I saw the dark chair he sat on was all tan with Oil-Dri dust. Must have sat on the garage floor.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But they look great and its nice to know a woman is willing to be uncomfortable for men:)
If it were up to me pants and flat shoes would be illegal on women.
A gal in stilletoes wobbles so nice when walking, but yes I do feel bad for them.........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kurt-
That is truly a bummer. :(
The problem is..... high heels are the bane of wood flooring.
As Rico posted the force of a person's weight applied over tiny area of a high heel tip generates very high contact stress.
My mom (may she rest in peace) was a high heel wearer nearly her entire life. She would come home from work & cook dinner in high heels on the solid oak floor. There were many small about 3/8" diameter but very shallow indents.
Here is a link to cross grain compression of various wood species... these numbers are at the "elastic limit", meaning stresses above this will generate permanent impressions.
http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/woodworking/Mechanical-Properties-of-Wood/Compressive-Or-Crushing-Strength.html
The cross grain compressive elastic limit stress for oak is about 850 psi
I measured the diameter of various heel tips.
.625 x .625 (round) >>>> not a high heel .31 sq in .375 x .625 (oval) >>>> semi high heel .24 sq in
"high" high heel (best guess at a worst case tip size) .375 x .375 (round) .11 sq in
put a 100 pound girl on a single heel tip (don't even consider dynamic effect due to dancing) and you get these contact stress
~325 psi ~420 psi ~900 psi
so the smaller diameter heel tips are getting close to the "damage limit".
Put a heavier girl (120? 150?) in the shoes and the stress goes higher. Someone on poorly a maintained heel, as Rico pointed out, is way over the limit. :(
Going down to the diameter of a BB (~.18) and now you're at 3,600 psi .......... even a 1/4" diameter giv you 2,000 psi. :(
I don't know the compressive capacity of engineered wood floor product but I assume its in the same ball park as real wood. Even if the substrate has better compression properties than real wood, the face ply is still real wood.
How about a sign?
"Fat people, please dance barefooted" or "Check your hooves & shoes"
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is exactly what I was wondering as I read the original post. My first thought was that engineered floors might be more susceptible; but when I think about it I'm not so sure. Our floors are 3/4" natural oak and after nearly 2-1/2 years they have picked up a few dings (AKA real-life patina :^} ). However, most have been caused by some kind of impact such as a Pizza Stone falling from about 6' (didn't do the stone any good either). We also put a little dent in during the moving process. No heels yet and I don't plan to test.
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kurt-
That is truly a bummer. :(
The problem is..... high heels are the bane of wood flooring.
As Rico posted the force of a person's weight applied over tiny area of a high heel tip generates very high contact stress.
My mom (may she rest in peace) was a high heel wearer nearly her entire life. She would come home from work & cook dinner in high heels on the solid oak floor. There were many small about 3/8" diameter but very shallow indents.
Here is a link to cross grain compression of various wood species... these numbers are at the "elastic limit", meaning stresses above this will generate permanent impressions.
http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/woodworking/Mechanical-Properties-of-Wood/Compressive-Or-Crushing-Strength.html
The cross grain compressive elastic limit stress for oak is about 850 psi
I measured the diameter of various heel tips.
.625 x .625 (round) >>>> not a high heel .31 sq in .375 x .625 (oval) >>>> semi high heel .24 sq in
"high" high heel (best guess at a worst case tip size) .375 x .375 (round) .11 sq in
put a 100 pound girl on a single heel tip (don't even consider dynamic effect due to dancing) and you get these contact stress
~325 psi ~420 psi ~900 psi
so the smaller diameter heel tips are getting close to the "damage limit".
Put a heavier girl in the shoes or someone on poorly maintained heel (as Rico pointed out) and you're over the limit. :(
Going down to the diameter of a BB (~.18) and now you're at 3,600 psi .......... even a 1/4" diameter give you 2,000 psi
I don't know the compressive capacity of engineered wood floor product but I assume its in the same ball park.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kurt Ullman wrote the following:

Many years ago, a woman with high heels attended a party at our house and after she left, there was a lot of small dents in our wood floor. It appeared that one, or both of her heels had lost the small rubber soles (?) on the heels and all that was left were the heads of the small nails that hold the rubber soles on. The floor was 6" x 6" engineered parquet oak veneer tiles. If your flooring has real wood veneer, you might try some lemon oil to raise the grain in those dents. It helped somewhat on our floor.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A steam iron might work, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Professional method to wood floor sanding London with advance and unique service provider that's name Fix Flooring which is helping to archive multiple Flooring like
Floor sanding services Laminate Flooring Installation Engineered wood floor install Choice of laminates Floor sanding services Laminate Flooring Installation Wood floor restorations Gap Filling Wood Floor varnishing Wood Floor staining Parquet flooring Floor sanding
Visit for more info : http://www.fixflooring.co.uk/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/2015 10:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Perhaps you wish to provide an in person technician for a free estimate in western NY, USA? We can have tea and strumpets.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.