wood fence -- reuse post holes in concrete?

I have an old wood fence that finally died in the usual fashion -- the posts rotted at the base and broke. Part of the fence is on concrete slab, and I was wondering if it is possible to extract the broken-off part of the posts from the existing post holes, and set the new posts in the same holes? Or will I need to do some demolition work on the slab and set the new posts in new concrete?
Thanks for any advice, Rick
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BF wrote:

There is no good way of doing this.
BTW, while it depends on the area, it may be better and result in longer lasting post to not use concrete and put the post directly in the ground. Concrete sometimes traps more moisture and caused post rot.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

It is possible but... Start by digging out any remains of the rotted posts. You will then have to use undersized, or trimmed to undersize, posts. Lot of work and you will wind up with loose posts unless you can find some type of filler that will set up solid. Better would be to use post anchors in the holes (if they will fit) set in fresh concrete. If they won't fit, use metal pipe (again set in concrete) and face them with boards.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Second. Dig out the wood. Put in a metal post. Add more concrete.
The problem disappears. Forever.
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Harry K wrote: ...

Post Anchors. I had not thought of that. I suppose if I had good solid concrete anchors, that might be a very good idea.

--
Joseph Meehan

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I've done it a couple of times. Its a lot of work removing the rotted post down 2 feet and then trimming the post base matching the existing hole.
If I had to do it over again I would do the demolition big enough for a post hole digger and then back fill with gravel or stone dust and top off with 4" concrete. This way you could replace the post in the future with ease just by breaking up the top layer of concrete.
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The last time I did this I swore that I would never do it again. I replaced all my posts with metal ones. Never again.
Dave
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Cool! How did you tie the wood to the metal posts or is the rest of the fence metal too?
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What about filling the hole with concrete and installing one of those surface mount post holders that keep the wood out of sitting moisture?
I'd think that'd be the best route to take.
--
be safe.
flip
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writes:

This would be good on vertical loads but no good on side to side forces - one good wind gust will bring the fence down.
I went to a home and garden show a few weeks ago and they had the 2' long pvc sleeves where you slip the 4x4 post into it. You bury and encase the pvc sleeve in concrete and if the post ever breaks you just pull it out and insert a new one.
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The metal posts are about 2 inches in diameter. There are metal clamps that go around the posts that are screwed to horzional 2X3s or 2X4s. You screw or nail the vertical planks of the fence to the 2X3s or 2X4s. You can get all this stuff at Lowes or Home Depot. They also have caps for the metal posts to finish off the tops of the posts.
Dave
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I had the same problem. Replaced the wooden posts with 2" metal posts. Since the wood in the concrete has rotted away, the posts can be hammered into the old holes. Took up the slack in the old concrete supports with small pebbles.
--

Walter


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remove old wood and drive the new posts in with a maul. if either bit loose tap in a few pressure treated wedges. i did this 9 years ago and they are still solid. and when these go i'll repeat it.
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BF wrote:

As others have mentioned, I'm to the point of filling the void with concrete. Then I make a 5' post out of 1/8"wall, 2" square tubing with a 1/4" plate at the bottom to form a "T". I drill two holes in the "T" plate. I drill two holes in the concrete and set the post in with two 3/8" x 4" anchors. If the post ever rusts through, I just unbolt the anchors and bolt new posts in. Maybe every 30 years or so. Fence wood, tubafors, get bolted to the posts and provide the basis for nailing the rest of the fence to. VERY solid! I just did the fence ( right side of the picture ) this way.
http://www.bunchobikes.com/pond148.jpg
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I'd like to thank everyone for all the great advice. One other thing -- what's the best way to go about getting the wood out of the hole if I go that route?
Thanks, Rick
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Breaker hammer would make fast work out of it. Rotary hammer would work too but will take longer. Either break off the concrete all around of just the wood. http://www.toolup.com/CategorySearchxaxNodexbx2832.html
Or use a long pry bar and pointed digging bar. http://www.barcotools.com/Barco%20Catalog%20P4.pdf Once you hit solid wood, sometimes, if you're so lucky, you could pull out the bottom section by hand. If its wedged solid, then break it apart with a digging bar. If you could screw in a very long lag bolt on top of the good wood, then you could pull the rest out with a car jack, winch or engine hoist.
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Ok, I'll give it a try.
Thanks, Rick
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