wood fence post preservative

for home made fence post preservative should proportion be 2 pts diesel fuel :1 pt motor oil or the reverse of this
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wrote:

This sounds like a match waiting to be lit. I agree that some sort of oil is good in a preservative base, but I have neighbors that would see how fast they could light these off if I used this mix. Why not just use black locust for fence posts? Yes, the bugs will chew them but the rot is very slow.
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Frank Thompson wrote:

The correct answer is NO.
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I have heard that used motor oil can be used to preserve fence posts. The ends are soaked as far up the post as one can manage, at least overnight (if i recall correctly). Then again, there is osage...!
ymmv.... Linda H.
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wrote:

I have heard that used motor oil can be used to preserve fence posts. The ends are soaked as far up the post as one can manage, at least overnight (if i recall correctly). Then again, there is osage...!
Nowadays there are fence posts made from recycled plastic that will last for like 25 years and more, available in many colors and is reasonably priced.
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Linda Hungerford wrote:

Lots of poisons can be used. That does not mean they should be used.
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then prime them and paint them two or three times. still vote for osage tho. Linda H.
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wrote:

Are you referring to orange osage by chance? It's a really nice looking piece of wood when it's sanded and clear coated.
Andy
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wrote:

You recommend osage, and someone else recommended black locust for the posts. Sounds good, but - are these woods available commercially? -- H
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On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 09:30:50 -0700 (PDT), Heathcliff

As a rule, probably not. A small locally owned lumber mill might cut these types of wood. Most of the time it is a case of grow your own or find someone willing to sell said tree for you to cut from their property. Both types of trees have thorns, so the lumberjack types avoid them. As a living fence, Osage/ black locust/ honey locust will slow human traffic and hold most livestock if incorporated with some type of wild roses or blackberry. A living fence takes a few years to reach 'hold livestock' size and usually will not hold small stock like goats or pets like cats or dogs. Still a living fence can help block ugly views/ road noise/ dust.
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wrote:

Osage is typically used as a living fence so would probably be difficult to find as lumber except close to where it grows. But locust lumber is used for all kinds of products so fencing is relatively easy to find, check fencing companies in your local yellow pages, ask at a local lumber yard, search on line. The primary thing however is to ascertain if it will be worth the expence for installing a fence that will very likely out live the property owner or the period one lives there. I would suspect that locust fencing is not going to come cheaply so it would behoove one to consider carefully.
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1016/is_3_106/ai_65774772 /
http://www.locustfence.com /
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Not a good idea.
Both components are carcinogenic. What happens if the fence posts are later burned?
Andy
Green Tip for the Day
Help minimize noise pollution and reduce stress, carry a cell phone jammer in restaurants made from recycled plastic. :-)
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On 8/12/2009 7:43 PM Andy spake thus:

You must be talking about McDonalds; restaurants made from recycled plastic?
[dangling modifier--couldn't resist]
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In article <7b58cad8-96a5-43ea-959e-9a3a3bc18900@

Whatever you have on hand. A good soak takes gallons. Diesel will soak faster, oil will last longer. A combination of the two is a compromise. Used hydraulic fluid or automatic transmission fluid works great too. Start with dry wood, or the water in the wood will prevent a good soak. Put the posts in a 55 gallon drum with the top off, and fill the drum to the top. Give the posts at least 24 hours in the goop, a week is better. Be sure to protect the barrel from rain or you will have a mess. Water will sink to the bottom and ruin the soak, while oil runs out the top.
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