Wood fence, digging barrier


Hi folks, am in the middle of replacing a dog ear 6ft tall fence in all the backyard. The old one had a wood barrier dug down about 6 inches. Rotted out over time obviously.
What simple solutions have the rest of you used to keep a dog from digging under? Lacking better answer I was thinking interlocking largish paving stones as a possible. Not hard to put in place but enough for my dog.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I had a dog that liked to dig I think I would use a single strand electric fence about 6" off the ground.
A single strand of barbed wire would save the same purpose but might involve a vet bill or two before the dog learned not to dig.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Colbyt hit the nail on the head. An electric fence is the way to go. They will not go near the fence after they get zapped once. I've used them for years. Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lp1331 1p1331 wrote:

There is a tape style electric fence for horses. That might be a good thing for dogs also. Rover might not go anywhere near that tape once he learns that it bites. The OP might be able to use that tape in other places without heating it up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 6 Mar 2010 19:01:24 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Lp1331 1p1331) wrote:

Yeah, but...
http://www.sibes.org/Sdo/Content/Image/libart/A000245_3.jpg
How about a role of metal flashing, cut to fit?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cshenk wrote:

Pavers would work, but unless you happen to have a pile of old ones sitting around, it'd be pretty spendy. Traditional material was the heavy galvanized hardware cloth, the kind that is so stiff you buy it sheets, not rolls, if you can find it anywhere. Try to catch the dirt in spring when it is soft, and make a slit with a long flat trenching shovel, and work the fabric down as far as you can. Tie the top to the fence with a screwed-in place horizontal rail, so you can replace a section easily if it rots out. Sort of a heavy-duty version of what gardeners do to keep rabbits and such from coming in under the fence around their fresh sprouting veggies.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
... .

That would be my choice. Where I live if I were to put an electric fence in and a neighbor kid got zapped, I would end up in jail. I think I will skip that idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dig a very narrow trench, and dump a bag of concrete mix in. Spray with a little water and cover. Moisture from the ground will harden up the rest of it to make a long continuous dog-proof barrier on the cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 6 Mar 2010 23:14:00 -0800 (PST), mike

I think you underestimate the strength & determination of a digging dog and overestimate the strength of concrete mixed that way. Fine for a post hole where there is only an occasional sidewards thump--- not so good for abrasion resistance.
I've never owned a digger- but the only dogfence I've ever installed was a 2x wire welded fence that went 6" below the surface- then was folded in for 6". That was on the recommendation of a coon hunter who had a few blueticks that liked to dig.
This site says to leave 1' of fence right on the surface- http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-a-Dog-from-Digging
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1. Concrete mix requires very little water to cure. A very thin trench will allow soil water access to all the concrete. Concrete is usually weakened from using too much water, rather than too little.
2. I didn't say what depth to use. Look at the dog in question and make your best estimate.
3. Have you ever seen a dog dig through concrete? I've never even seen one even scratch the surface. Dog claws simply aren't that hard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can tell you what worked and didn't work for me. My dogs dug around my garden and 6' privacy fence and deck. My neighbor's dogs dug from the outside. I had a dog that chewed at the fence too to get out.
WORKED: 1. piled big stones along the bottom and also planted steel fabric about 6" down. 2. spent more time in the back with my dogs and shamed them when they started to dig. 3. buried all of the holes (from my side) as soon as they appeared. 4. covered the open slits with strip wood so that the dogs could not see to the other side. I bought landscaping fabric to try this too but never got around to using it.
THOUGHT ABOUT USING: 1. low voltage wire electric fence. 2. some sort of sound generator or spring loaded devise to scare them is they started to dig. 3. poured concrete footing.
DIDN'T WORK: 1. ground Cayenne pepper sprinkled on the ground 2. wood chips poured into the hole
good luck
phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tenkill" wrote "cshenk" wrote:

Thank you! That was an excellent detailed message.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"cshenk" wrote

Hi folks, thanks for all the excellent suggestions! I didnt add enough info here above (silly me, didn't realize it).
This is a dog who digs enough to make a patch to lay in but just for the fun of it (not a boredom related thing, and not by the fence as in trying to escape).
It has also to do with potential neighbor dogs (back and one side are renters), some of whom have been diggers. I can't use an electric fence on their side and don't need that level on my end (fortunately, but it's *spot on* for those who do!) In fact, for any other dog owners with a problem digger, it's the easiest yet effective method and not all that expensive. They are low voltage and quite safe. The only drawback is they won't do diddly squat to keep a neighbor dog from dugging under your fence to come play with your pooch (grin).
I liked the idea of the trench with cement up along the sides. The paving stone idea was a simpler method (wasnt thinking expensive ones, but can get them pretty easy off freecycle here). I figured if a pooch did try to dig under the stones, they'd just drop down and frustrate any normal one into giving up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cshenk wrote:

Is this a warm-weather thing? Is your dog a long-hair? I've seen them dig sleeping spots to stay cool, since the dirt draws heat better than grass. Interesting smells in the dirt are sometimes another temptation for them. A shaded open-sided mini-carport next to the dog house, raised up so it catches the breezes, may prove entertaining. Pavers would be great for that, covered with one of those rubber floor mats in a non-heat-catching color. (But you want it to be something you can hose off, so not carpet scraps.)
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"aemeijers" wrote

He's a mixed dog that at first glance seems mostly beagle (onely tan and white, not the other sort that has tri-color). Means short but thick coat.
More cold tolerant than his coat would indicate, he has problems with heat. Yes, he digs more in summer if we let him out long enough. We are careful to not let him out more than a few mins when it hits over 85 here.

Now this I would like to explore as well. He has no doghouse (not being an outdoor dog) but I bet he would like one. Let me throw the best one at you. We are seeing if a new rescue dog can work in with our dog and cat. 'Apple' spent the afternoon here.
http://www.k9newlife.org/dogs_for_adoption_2/apple.html
She's sweet as can be and got along well with Cash. Suprisingly the cat came out to meet her and played a bit with her. At least, several friendly sniffs. Not quite to the 'sleeping in sin' together level but that takes a few days ;-)
So, I need a double doggie house ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You *fill* the trench with concrete, not line it (in case that's what you were imagining). It's quite easy. It'll leave you with an underground strip of concrete to whatever depth you feel like digging.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.