Wood exterior doors?

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Here's what I did.
I went to the Lowes website and used the search term, "Exterior doors". I will go there now and list the categories that come up. Actually the term they use is "Entry doors".
Oh duh! And now I see when I look at the left side of the screen, there are 4 listings for wood entry doors. I had not seen that before. I just looked at the big pictures that say: In-Stock, Steel, Fiberglass, Energy Star, Decorative and Hardware.
But still... They sell 748 Fiberglass and 464 Steel doors. Only 4 wood? Seems that wood is not so popular now. Then when I used my Swagbucks search engine, the first hit I got was for a site that sells really fancy doors that cost over $1,000.
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On Tue, 6 May 2014 22:01:14 -0700, "Julie Bove"

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It's a very lightweight door which is why I think they put the jury rigged plastic kickplate on it.
Daughter and I came home once and I was in a hurry to get into the house. I pushed the door open quickly, not realizing that my husband was in the laundry room. I still snicker as I remember this. The door is lightweight enough not to injure him but it did send him flying into the wall. Our laundry room isn't very big so my daughter and I saw him splat sort of splayed out and flat into the wall. We thought it was hilarious. Husband? Not so much.
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so your search engine is broke and you can't make your phone work?
At any rate, the repair people I have hired

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Don't you have something better to do than stalking me on the Internet? I don't *want* a wood door! I don't even want any door right now. I was just looking to see what is available.
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your house was inspected and they didn't tell you that your doors were code violators? what did the bank say when you failed your home inspection?
we were told that there is too

the insulation caught fire? how? what kind of insulation catches fire?
That space is all open up there and we were told

and now when you file an insurance claim, the insurance inspector will notice all of the code violations and you won't get paid on your claim
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On 05/08/2014 01:40 PM, Malcom "Mal" Reynolds wrote:

If that were true then no one would ever have their claims paid.
A good inspector can find multiple code violations in virtually *ANY* house.
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Yes. My mom is selling her house. It was built in 1962. It was built well. It's just that codes have changed over the years and some things were not up to code.
We are getting a new roof. We don't have any vents. Or the kind of vents that a roof needs. We have to have those put in to make it up to code which is a good thing. He said the garage in particular was quite bad. It gets very damp in there.
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On Thursday, May 8, 2014 9:47:33 PM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:

Who says you have to change things to make it up to code? Are you confusing what a "home inspector" squaks about with what is actually required by code? Normally, probably 90%+ of what was built to code at the time it was built is not required by law to be brought up to current code, meaning you could get a CO and sell the house to a buyer. An example of an exception would be smoke detectors. But the town isn't going to require you to bring the electrical system up to current code. A home inspector is free to squak about anything he wants to. And if you want to sell the house to his buyer, then you may have to fix what he's squaking about or give a discount, but if what they are squaking about is unreasonable, you could also find another buyer.
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This was the inspector that we hired prior to buying the house.
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On Sunday, May 11, 2014 6:55:52 AM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:

And a bad one can find multiple "alleged" code violations too.

It sounds like you are conflating several things. Let's take the example of roof venting. If a house was built to the code at the time, in most jurisdictions, as long as the roof venting met the code at the time the roof went on, then the house is grandfathered because most of the codes are not applied retroactively. So, I'm guessing you hired a home inspector and he looked at the roof. He might have said that the roof looks like it's in the middle of it's life, but that in his opinion, it should have more venting. In that case, as long as the roof venting met the code at the time it was built, it's not a code violation. You could get a CO and buy the house if you chose to. You can probably choose to not buy the house unless the seller increases the venting, but the seller can also say he's not doing it and there is very likely no code that says he or you has to bring it up to current code.
Or he could have said that it needs a new roof and that the venting is inadequate. In that case, when you put a new roof on, the venting most likely would have to be increased if it doesn't meet today's reqts for venting.
Note that I'm not arguing that if the roof venting is inadequate, increasing it isn't a good idea. If it doesn't have adequate venting I'd increase it. I'm just saying that if it was built to code at the time, it's unlikely you have to bring it up to code. If you applied that to all the various things in houses, there would be a huge amount of expensive work required on houses that were even just 20 years old. There are some things that are required to be up to current new code, eg smoke detectors, but those things are the exceptions.
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Yes. At the time we bought the house, no houses had vents like we will be getting. I only began to notice them a few years ago. However, if they will fix the problem of the damp garage, I'm all for it!

Yes.

Agree. But when he said that it needed vents, particularly over the garage, I did tell him that indeed that was where we were having problems.
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On 05/08/2014 05:47 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

Some building codes, like venting a roof, are useful. As I'm sure you are aware, without proper venting, the life of the building structure will be drastically shortened.
Other codes, like mandatory residential fire sprinkler systems, are of dubious value. Their main purpose is to enrich the pockets of the fire sprinkler manufacturers.
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wrote:

No clue. Looks like fiberglass. You can still see the blackened part where it was smoldering.

I didn't file a claim.
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of course. how else could they afford to pay you for using their search engine if they didn't direct you to the high end of every search?
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What? Lowes doesn't pay me!
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wrote in message wrote:

Celluose.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

I've never seen a plastic kickplate.
I put a brass kickplate on mine outside because the veneer was chipping at the bottom. The inside needs one too now. I'm trying to decide how tacky it looks, if at all, but I think it's common and no one will notice.

I don't think it works that way. It it was heavy enough to send him into the wall, it's heavy or maybe you were continuing to push on it. . It didnt' injure him because instead of standing still while he was hit, he moved away from the door, whether propelled by the door or by his own reflex and muscles.
To see if the door is solid or not, I'd tap on it. A solid door will make a different sound from your interior hollow doors, like for the bedroom and bathroom.
No one has pointed out that if your door was code when the house was built, or later for that matter, it's probably grandfathered in, and okay. Even if newly constructed houses in the same jurisdiction would have have to have a better door.
I think one could count on less than one hand the number of things that people have been forced to change on a house that was up to code when built.
I can only think of one, a fence around a swimming pool. That is, there might be some place where swiimming pools were built and no fence was required around it at the time. Maybe Hollywood in 1925. Or some all farm area which suddenly got suburbanite "subdivisions" and pools before they could change the laws.
Are there others?
I'm not talking about banning slaughterhouses or pig farming or oil drilling in an area that used to allow them, but about physical construction of the house.
My friend 5 years ago bought a house with knob and tube wiring. It was still legal in that house, though my friend replaced it anyhow.

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Well, I can only assume that is what it is because it is on the lower part of the door. They (former owners) stuck the plastic on there.

I didn't really push on it. I just flung it. And it is very lightweight.

This door sounds very hollow.

Okay. I just know when the house was inspected, nothing was said about doors.
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but swagbucks does and where do you think swagbucks gets the money to do that?
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