Wood cutting problem

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I have some 15 or so long wooden pieces, ~ 6" wide, 4 - 5' long. I will need to make these into a narrower strips. I have Skilsaw, hand saws, saber saw, and a bench vise. Unfortunately, no table saw or access to one. The only way I see is using the hand or possibly saber saw and the vise to make the cuts. Very slow work and an easy way to miscut. Any ideas? Or give up on that project that requires these strips?
TIA
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| I have some 15 or so long wooden pieces, ~ 6" wide, 4 - 5' long. I will | need to make these into a narrower strips. I have Skilsaw, hand saws, saber | saw, and a bench vise. Unfortunately, no table saw or access to one. The | only way I see is using the hand or possibly saber saw and the vise to make | the cuts. Very slow work and an easy way to miscut. Any ideas? Or give up | on that project that requires these strips? |
Do you have any C clamps? If it were me I'd clamp a straight edge (ideally a piece of factory cut birch ply) to the wood for cutting, then cut it over a box, barrel, or some such. Cut one end while supported, then switch the support to finish the cut.
Caveats: The offset of the blade is probably about 1 1/2", so there's a limit to how thin a board can be with this method. Also, be sure to put some little shims under the C clamp tips. Otherwise you'll make circular dents in the board.
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On Wednesday, June 8, 2016 at 9:49:31 AM UTC-4, KenK wrote:

get a mill to cut them. home depot probably can too
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or buy a cheap table saw from harbor freight
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On 6/8/2016 6:49 AM, KenK wrote:

How thin will the resulting strips need to be?
(Half) the width of the "foot" on the sabre saw is no doubt skinnier than the 6". Measure the distance from the blade to the right (or left) edge of the foot. To this, add the thickness of the desired strip. Fasten a guide ("fence") to the 6" wide piece at this distance from the edge. Rip the board while holding the edge of the foot against this guide.
[you are essentially making a table saw "inside out" -- letting the wood be fixed while the saw moves along it -- with the fence attached to the wood instead of the saw!]
You will eventually get to a point where the guide needs to be positioned *past* the edge of the board (i.e., when the remaining board width is less than the desired width of the strip plus the distance from blade to edge of shoe).
At this point, place a second board alongside the first and secure both to your worksurface (i.e., make the original board seem to be wider by the addition of this adjacent board).
Depending on the width of the strips, you may find it easier to just buy lumber in that desired width!
[Note that you can often harvest thin strips of wood from things like prefab "latticework"]
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Unknown. Will find out later as the work progresses but could be any width. Depends on other unpredictable factors. Width will vary between strips.
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KenK wrote:

Time to buy at least a cheap table saw . OR , if you have a router , rout a shallow cutout in some plywood/mdf/particle board that will fit your skilsaw's bottom plate . Mount said skilsaw upside down in said recess . You now have a "table saw" , use clamps and a guide board adjusted as needed for width .
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On Wed, 08 Jun 2016 07:02:37 -0700, Don Y

your skill saw the right distance from the blade to act as a fence. Make the board nice and long and run the boards through against that fence.Could even use one of your boards n as the fence if you have a spare or iff 2 screw holes will not be a problem.
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On 6/8/2016 2:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And, when the next strp needs to be a little wider or narrower, drill two *more* holes?

I keep an 8' length of bar stock and clamp this to whatever I'm ripping. Then, can use ANY of the saws that I have against it as a guide (fence) -- and my saws are none the worse for wear!
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On Wed, 08 Jun 2016 14:43:43 -0700, Don Y

and in to the next requires position, and refasten with the screwas in the same holes in the saw. For cripes sake, it's NOT ROCKET SCIENCE.

saw, and they make the saw a whole lot more usefull
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On 6/8/2016 5:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And this is HOW much easier than clamping a straight edge to the board in question?
"For cripes sake, its not rocket science!"

How do you rip a 4x8' sheet of plywood with your approach? I just move my guide and reclamp it...
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On Wed, 08 Jun 2016 17:53:25 -0700, Don Y

That depemds on the width of the board and the strips required You start with a 6 inch nominal board (5 1/2") board. You need to cut it into 8 peices. That's 6 cuts that's 3/4" wasted in cuts, leaving each strip just a shade under 0.6". How are you going to cut that board with a straight edge clamped to the board? Or try cuttimg cedar strips for a canoe out of 1X10 rough resawn lumber from an old hydro pole- 16 or 18 feet long. My method works. Not sure yours will. I can clamp the handle of mine into a workmate and use it like a table saw.

straight-edge. In fact I also have an adapter - can't remember the name of it right off hand - that makes my circular saw into a track-saw for cutting panels. An aluminum track about 10 feet long is screwed to an 8 foot X 2 foot shunk of 1 inch baltic birch Sheet of plywood buts to the track, "T" carriage slides in the track carrying the saw across the sheet, cutting it to whatever dimension you choose and can cur the panel in half the short dimension as well. I can re-adjust to whatever dimension I want in seconds - guaranteed square every time. I can use it with a router instead of the saw too - to sloy a panel to look like boards / bead-board panel, or even slot-boards. Instead of the somewhat dodgy clamps to hold the saw to the carriage, I can bolt it precisely in place using those 2 screw holes in the sole plate.

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On 6/8/2016 7:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Mark 0.6" from edge of board. Align with blade (of WHATEVER type of saw you are using!). Lay guide against side of shoe. Clamp. Cut. Repeat.
When the width of the board is no longer sufficient to *support* the shoe and the guide, lay another board alongside -- anything that has the same *thickness* as the first board.

And my solution doesn't preclude putting the 6" board on a bandsaw and cutting it there, either!
Or, for scoring drywall.
Or, 80 lb roofing felt.

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On Thu, 09 Jun 2016 16:02:26 -0700, Don Y

Which is not the method I responded too. I was responding to clamping the guide to the board. Clamping or screwing the guide to the plate is in essence the same method, but clamps dlip. Clamps get in the way. Clamps get knocked off. Screws hold tight, stay out of the way, and will never slip.

If you have a bandsaw the whole situation changes.

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On 6/8/2016 5:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Skilsaws would have them.
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On 06/08/2016 8:49 AM, KenK wrote:

Make a guide for the Skilsaw on bench or good set of 'horses. Set a guide at proper distance from edge for first cut and fasten it down. Use fence on its face to run the baseplate against; after the first cut use spacer of proper width to position board to next cut. The spacers don't need to be full length so can be made by hand easily enough.
Or, an inexpensive but quite serviceable jobsite contractors TS isn't much outlay at one of the box stores, actually, and while I've never used one of theirs, some of the _very_ inexpensive HF variety get decent reviews for occasional use.
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rent a table saw.
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"wooden pieces" more commonly known as boards.
Clamp (or cramp if you're british) a guide board with a straight edge to the board being ripped and use your skilsaw.
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KenK wrote:

As most others have said, clamp a straight edge to the piece to be cut to act as a fence for your Skilsaw. Problem is, the foot of the saw is large relative to the width of the work. Assuming your boards are all the same thickness, butt them edge to edge and clamp the lot down. You now have a wide board.
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On Wednesday, June 8, 2016 at 12:35:12 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

I must be missing something.
Could you explain how this process would (no pun intended) work? How would someone clamp two 6" wide boards together to form a 12 inch and then cut off a 1" strip?
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