Wood Burning Stove Clearances

ok, going crazy with google. pretty much useless or im not using it right. anyways...what would be the minimal clearance between a 6" single walled flue and the closest stud/ceiling joist/whatever. they will be wrapped in 5/8 firecode sheetrock and/or 1/2 denzshield.
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I R Baboon wrote:

firecode sheet rock does not reduce your comb. clearance. single walled flue requires 18". call your local fire dept. they should be able to consult you on codes in your area.
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fire codes are local. Ask the building inspector!
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Whatever the required clearance is, it is measured to the nearest combustable surface, i.e., the stud. What that stud is covered with is immaterial AFAIK. My clearance is right at the miniumum but I had to convince the inspector that the 1" he was complaining about was all sheetrock and not combustable. He was measuring to the surface of the wall.
BTW. 1" sheetrock was due to remodel. Had to space out the finish stuff with a 1/2" strip to match up wall surfaces.
Harry K
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Here in Washington state, the clearances are dictated by the manufacturer of the woodstove. Stoves are tested and rated accordingly, and clearances vary from one stove to the next (even from the same company).
When I installed my stove, the inspector came out, checked the installation manual, and made sure my clearances met or exceeded the manufacturers recommendations.
If you know the brand and model of your stove, check to see if the manufacturer has a web site with specifications for your stove.
For "unlisted" appliances (antique stoves, used stoves, or other stoves than have not been rated), the clearances are rather large. I think the stove has to be something like 36" away from any combustible surface. I think the chimney pipe can be closer, but since it comes out of the top of the stove, it's usually equal to or greater than the stove clearance (unless your wall or ceiling slopes).
You can reduce the clearance by using double-wall chimney pipe, and/or by building a special shield between the stove and combustible surfaces.
Where the chimney pipe actually passes through the ceiling, I had to keep the ceiling framing at least 2" from the chimney pipe. I opted for 3" clearance around the pipe. This is for triple-wall pipe, I don't know what the requirements are for single wall (or if it's even allowed where it penetrates the ceiling).
In any case, check with your local building department. They're the ones who will give you final approval, and can provide the information you need.
Take care,
Anthony
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