Wood Burning Stove

My uncle was given a wood burning stove, Soffolk County in NY.He checked with a local installer and the price he quoted, my uncle felt it was way too high. Anyway I'm looking for a mail order warehouse, and can somebody tell me what I need. Here is what he wants to do. The back of the stove has an 8" opening and he wants to go thru the ceiling. That will be roughly 12 feet.Can he reduce the pipe to 6" from the 8", will that work?
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Going through what ceiling. I don't think anything like that us permitted here.
Greg
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wrote:

1. Check to see if the stove will meet current code for wood stoves. This may involve finding the manufacturer's installation specifications. If they are not available, the stove probably will not meet code. 2. If the stove does not meet code, your insurance company may not cover you. They usually want a certificate showing that it passed inspections by a licensed installer. 3. If the stove has an 8" flue, that is normally a clue that it needs an 8" flue pipe to the chimney. 4. What is he installing it on, what is the wall next to it made of, what is the clearance to the wall, what is the ceiling made of, you may need shields, masonry hearth, double wall flue pipe to the chimney. He may find that the local installer is quite reasonable when he has to accommodate the safety requirements.
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Make sure your installer gets all necessary permits, inspections, etc, if you want to have your insurance company cover you in the event of a loss.
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If you don't tell the insurance company it was installed, the may not over it. It raises premiums.
Greg
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Start with your insurance company. Ours said it would be an additional $10 a year on our homeowner's. No permit required. Or they will tell you that they don't insure them. Next, city hall. Ours said no permit required. The clearances were on the stove, but are mostly available on line, or from the fireplace shop. Good idea to have something on the walls. Sheetrock walls will take the heat, but do get mighty warm. May scorch a little if you have it too close, or get it real hot, but sheetrock and glass insulation doesn't burn easily. Easy to get some backerboard or tile, and have peace of mind. They also make decorative panels that just slap up around the stove. Don't forget the floor, and carry the hard floor out about 3' in front of the stove, as you will eventually drop a hot coal.
Steve
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I posted a picture so you can get a better idea,as far as insurance goes he will take care of that.Anybody knows a good supply house on line. Thanx
http://www.imagebam.com/image/16def3224734855
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hear hear
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Try northerntool.com
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Try northerntool.com
Google is your friend. Enter "wood burning stove" and I bet you get a hit.
Steve
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ood stoves are nearly as bad as knob and tube wiring, a bad roof, a vacant home, a broken sidewalk, steps without a railing, fuse boxes, etc etc...
many homeowners policies refuse to insure homes for a wide variety of issues.
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wrote:

Does it matter what the law is WHERE YOU LIVE, Greg?
OP should check with a local fireplace shop WHERE HE LIVES for local laws, and suggestions as to whether choking down the pipe is a good idea. Fireplace and stove stores are a very good source of information for that sort of thing.
FYI, I have six apparatuses that carry wood stove exhaust through either a ceiling or roof. I have two wood burning stoves, plus the range exhaust over the cooktop. They are a flat sheet metal piece, with a hole in the center for the pipe. There's a little more to it than that, but that's a basic description. You can get the pipe in various numbers of successive pipes within each other, all designed to either keep the outermost pipe cooler, or perhaps intake some air for the stove through the outer annulus. You can get the "jacks" or flat square pieces with the holes cut at different angles for different roof pitches. Start at a fireplace shop. In my state, it is legal, but that's like me telling you that you are nuts because you say you are going to have rain tomorrow, and I'm going to have sunshine.
Poor old Greg.
Steve
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On Fri, 07 Dec 2012 20:33:44 -0500, Perry Salazar

First off, you should not reduce the outlet size. If 8" is needed at the bottom, it is needed at the top for proper draft.
Before you even start, get some professional advice either from an installer or a proper book. Wrong installation can result in a burned down house, even death from a fire.
I'm not up on the latest codes but triple wall tubing is generally what is used in the US and there is a double wall Class A for Canada.
Find out what is needed to support the pipe, do a proper layout for cleanouts, drip leg, flashing, and the proper height above the roof. There are codes for that also.
Some towns require permits and inspections, as do some insurance companies. There are also codes to stove placement to walls, etc.
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Re the chimney size you will need to consult the manufacturer's data sheet. It will also depend on how many bends (if any) there needs to be in the chimney.
There are all sorts of other issues with the installation to prevent fire and give proper ventilation.
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Wood stove installation nowadays requires a building permit (from the municipal building permits office, which can also answer your questions, e.g. about pipe size.) Be warned that some house insurers refuse to cover houses with wood stoves.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

opening

If you want your house to be covered in case of fire - like in case the WHOLE house burns down...
-You need to get approval from your homeowners insurance company. They WILL want to see a building permit and see that ALL work (including the chimney) was inspected and passed...
-And the local building inspector WILL want to see that EVERYTHING (including the chimney) was installed to the woodstove manufacturer's instructions as well as the chimney manufacturer's instructions.
Note the installation instructions will be DIFFERENT for each different model of woodstove! Chimney size, distance woodstove MUST be from walls, R-Value of hearth, etc.
If you do not bother to install the woodstove properly and safely, why should your insurance company pay for damage done because your house catches on fire and burns to the ground?
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When I asked my insurer, they just said it should be professionally installed. I think a permit and inspection would work for me. Around here you usually see an external insulated pipe running up the side of the house, but it's usually more than a one story complex. The pipes are ugly.
Greg
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says...

WOW! I just called my insurance company, and they said it would be $10 more per year on my homeowner policy. I called my local building permits department, and they said, "Enjoy your new stove."
I guess things are different where I live. Your advice must be only where you live, and if I lived there, I wouldn't live there.
Usenet obtained information is priceless. It's free, and worth easily ten times that. The receiver of such information must take all answers with a grain of salt, because, although well intentioned, it is written as if everyone lives in the same community and state as the poster.
We remodeled the bedroom, and will be putting in a new wood stove just to keep the chill off of things, and because we economize with free wood, lowering our fuel bills. I will call the insurance company, and perhaps my insurance will go up another $10 per year. I won't bother to call the permit department, because I already know they don't give a care about retrofitting a home with a wood stove in our community.
To the OP, check it out with YOUR insurance agent, and YOUR town's building permit department, and YOUR local fireplace shop.
Then enjoy.
Steve
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Bill wrote:

I dunno. Perhaps because you paid premiums for the coverage?
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wrote:

So I pay *my* premiums-- Can I start a fire on my living room floor without the benefit of a stove or fireplace and expect my insurance company to pay up?
It is a contract-- I pay them and promise I'll be careful. They cover if something that isn't my fault happens. Works for me.
I don't want to pay the premiums for your model.
Jim
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wrote:

So you're insurance doesn't cover your house if you knock a candle over and the house burns?

I don't want your insurance at all.
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