Wiring to garage

I'm looking at running electrical wiring from my home to my garage. The distance is about 60 feet. I'm located in Calgary, AB, Canada.
It appears that wiring must be buried within a conduit and that direct burial wire is not allowed. Can anyone verify if this is the case?
This is a three car garage, with one stall being a small workshop. Considering that there will only ever be one person working in the garage, would a 30 amp double circuit service be OK, or should I run a 40 or even 60 amp service?
Since I'll have the trench open for electrical, and a gas line is permitted in the same trench, would it be wise to have the gas company/contractor come and install a gas line at the same time as I'm doing the electical?
Any information or suggestions are appreciated!
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I am recalling from memory. The main point in my response is that you can do the work yourself except for the inspection. For that phone up the city to get the exact regulations. I am from Edmonton.
The depth of the trench is 3 feet (phone up the gas company and ask). Get the gas company to make up the gas pipe. The City inspector will examine your istallation before you are allowed to cover it. The gas pipe will be tested for leaks. The pipe will be pressurized from a nitrogen tank and the pressure must be maintained over 24 hours or something like that. The electrical cable can be one of those that can be buried without using a conduit. It was required to be separated from the gas pipe with a 2 x 4 treated wood stud. Use a cable rated for 220 volt 40 amps service as 220 volts will be useful for running tools like a table saw. Use a sub breaker box in the garage. Inside the house it is connected to a 220V 30 amp breaker. The garage 220 circuit is on a 20 amp breaker so that it will trip first before it can go back to the main panel. The 115V circuits can be regular 15 amp breakers. I also buried a PVC conduit in the same trench. In it I ran two lines of telephone wires for a phone, burglar alarm(?) and spares. I also ran a coax cable for TV and maybe a computer link. There was also an outdoor rated 115V 14/2 cable to run power back into the house.
I have so far only hooked up the 220V system and the phone connection. If I had my druthers I wouldn't have the gas line. It will cost too much to buy a garage gas heater and to operate it in an uninsulated garage. If its that cold stay indoors and enjoy something else.
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Noozer wrote:

You'll never regret running a larger service than you could have got by with. You don't know; you might want to add a welder later, or a big dust collector that runs at the same time as a big table saw, etc.
The trench is the expensive part, even with copper prices at historic highs. Don't forget that there is nothing wrong with using properly terminated aluminum wires for big circuits.
Bob
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unless you need everything immediately run a bunch of spare conduit or even 4 inch PVC pipes so you can add whatever later.
document the trench depth with inspection and photos and conduits so theres never a inspection issue later. put everything in oversize conduit,
GO BIG like 100 amp on sub panel and cabling, you will never regret the extra investment
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All I can offer is what we would do here in WalkAboutCreek in Australia, mate.
Dig a trench.
Put the wire in it.
Hook it up.
If no sparks, proceed to use it.
We have no inspectors or rules here. And if it fries a roo or wallaby, it's just free lunch. I'd check with your local authorities to be sure. What works here in WalkAboutCreek might not work where you are.
Steve ;-)
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The local building inspector. will have that information. Here we can us direct burile, but I have no idea in your area.

What will yo do there? If you expect to run a table saw, you need a 20A circuit for just that, maybe even a 220v for a larger one.

If you ever plant to add heat, yes, do it now and save a bundle later. Since you have cars parked in there, code may have something to say about using a gas heater or where it must be mounted. Best to check that first. .
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wrote in message

I'm planning on calling once I've decided what I really need and what I would like.

What's got me wondering is what gauge wiring that I'll need, since the run will be about 70+ feet. Code calls for NMDU wiring, installed into PVC conduit, 6-3 gauge for split 60amp, 8-3 for split 40 amp and 10-3 for split 30 amp.

I'm hoping to add heat, but I was also thinking about going with an oil tank and furnace. I've got to room for it and lane access to have it filled.
The reason I'm considering running the 80+ foot gas line is to add a BBQ oulet. I had having to fill those propane containers.
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gas furnace requires less maintence, why add a oil tank if not necessary?
if you run the gas line for the BBQ might as well run a larger diameter one and have the ability to add a furnce later if you want.
any need for water in the garage?
run a empty 4 inch pvc for later additions if you hadnt wanted now
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