Wiring through exterior wall

I have a pond in front of my house. At the present time, my pump and other devices are simply plugged into an extension cord that runs through a window to a recptacle in my garage. Temporary power. Anyway, there are no receptacle around the area where the pond is. I have several lights that are wired together under my house for lighting the crawl space. The end of the run for the lights is about 20' from the exterior wall where I am wanting to install a GFCI socket to power the pond stuff. I would like to be able to use the circuit the lights are on as the power source for the outdoor recaptacle by either removing the lights all together or maybe even running the power from the last light in the run to/through the exterior wall to the GFI. Can I do this? Should the lights be taken out of the circuit? Also, what is the best way to run the cable through the foundation to the outside of the house. I have read that I would need to have a junction box on the inside of the wall(under the house) that is joined to the receptacle box (for the GFI on the outside of the wall)with a piece of conduit for the cable to run through the brick. This correct? Is there a better or simpler solution to do this?
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what circuit is this on?, other loads?
where I am wanting to install a GFCI socket to power the

lights might be switched so the outlet may only have power when the would be on
Should the lights be taken out of the circuit? Personally I do not like to have loads on with out a reason.
Also, what is the

With out information on the construction. I can not see it very well.
I have read that I would need to have a junction box on the

Running cable through a conduit is always a good idea when going through brick, block or concrete.
This correct? Is there a better or

Hard to say since you do not provide the load your planning on adding. Generally fixed equipment should be on its own circuit.
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The lights under the house are switched. Which is a problem as I do not want to have the lights on for the pond pump to run. I think I may be able to tap into an existing socket that is in a bedroom just on the other side of the wall Im wanting to add the gfci to.
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If you are running a fractional hp motor, go for a separate circuit. You don't want the pond pump to shut down the bedroom lights.
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wrote:

It's unlikely that the OP needs a fractional hp motor and separate circuit unless they are running a high volume waterfall. Most pond pumps are in the 60 - 100 watt range. It would be wasteful to run a new circuit to serve a 100 watt device.
One other option you have is if you can tap into an always-on (unswitched circuit) is using an X10 style relay receptacle or module to do the switching. Operation of the switch would be from an inexpensive X10 transmitter located in a convenient loacation. I believe they sell x10 duplex outlets with one outlet switched, the other always on. Naturally, you have to be concerned about weatherproofing and have an outdoor receptacle cover. As a bonus, you can easily automate the hours of operation with X10 stuff and perhaps put it on a timer.
Beachcomber
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X10 would be sweet, but probably more than I need to try right now, not very experienced with electrical.
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