Wiring question

My son is fixing up his basement. He is not covering the cement walls. There are no wall outlets. I plan on helping him put some service into the room. We will tap into a line that powers an overhead light.

come into the room. Anyone have some ideas on making this look decent against the concrete? We plan on using some type of conduit. I've seen a type of conduit that is flat with outlets that can be placed anywhere along the length. All ideas are welcome.
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You can use Wiremold #500 or #700 raceway for power. They sell it at Home Depot, but your local electrical supply house probably has a better selection of accessories and better prices. Ask to look at a Wiremold catalog.
You might want to consider running a separate line for this instead of tapping off of an existing circuit. Five or six outlets plus lights may overload an existing circuit.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

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On Mon, 3 Jan 2005 16:17:05 -0500, "John Grabowski"

Depending on what is plugged in your are right.
Also, do you want to plug in something and trip the breaker, to also have your lights go out? Yikes.

later,
tom @ www.URLBee.com
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I should have mentioned that running from an existing line was our last option. Just being in the planning stages and 80 miles away, I'm not aware if there are any empty spaces in his breaker box. I was lucky when I wired my basement years ago in that I had empty spaces. I assume that 14 gauge wire is sufficient with 15 Amp protection in fact, I recall that it is required. Also, if the first outlet is GFIC, will that protect the other outlets downstream from it?
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This is Turtle.
Full boxes are not a problem now a days with the piggy Back breakers and can run two circuits off one slot now a days.
TURTLE
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Good thinking. I've got a few in my present breaker box and hadn't thought of it. Now, back to my OP.......I need advise on what to do about a conduit......metal or PVC? Also, what would be a good way to connect it to the concrete block wall?
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This is Turtle.
Concrete wall ankers for conduit. They sellthe screw, ankors, and clips to hold the conduit all where they sell the wire and conduit fittinmgs.
TURTLE
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Just use EMT and paint it the same color as the walls.
You will need a hammer drill and masonry bits to install the concrete anchors.
Don't put lighting and receptacles on the same circuit.
Preforably put in a 20A circuit for the receptacles.
Yes, you can use a single GFCI at the beginning to give GFCI protection for the number of receptacles that you will be adding. Put the GFCI in a double wide box (box normally used for 2 regular sized receptacles) and deep too. GFCI receptacles are too big for me to want to put them in most places!
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On Mon, 3 Jan 2005 23:26:26 -0600, "TURTLE"

except in cases of panels that are no longer being made which is a problem I have encountered. Rather than replace the whole thing, I will be installing a sub-panel.
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TURTLE wrote:

Turtle Unless the panel is designed for tandem breakers installing them violates the listing of the panel which violates the US National Electric Code. If that violation were to cause a fire the insurance carrier could walk away from the loss and decline to pay it. Breakers marked for replacement use only are recognized or listed for use in panels that were designed for tandem breakers but were manufactured before the requirement for circuit limiting (CTL) assemblies was adopted. CTL assemblies will only accept the number of tandem or half width breakers for which they were designed. Pre CTL assemblies rely on the installer to obey the requirement of NFPA 70, section 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment which reads in part B "B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling." That includes the list of breakers that are include on the interior labeling. Just because a non CTL breaker will physically fit in the panel does not make it OK to use in that panel. -- Tom H
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HorneTD wrote:

OK......well and good for someone knowing the code and all. But, in regular do-it-yourself language....how can I tell if a breaker box is OK with a tandem breaker?
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If that breakers model/part number is not listed on the label in the panel cabinet and that panel's model/part number is not listed on a list that is packed with the breaker then you cannot use that breaker in that panel. -- Tom H
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