Wiring in a DSL filter

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I need to wire a DSL filter with a modular jack and plug into a phone line without a modular jack/plug. I figured I'd cut the plug off the DSL filter and wire those into the phone line. However, the colors of the wires in the DSL filter are black, red, green, and yellow and I think the phone line is in pairs with different colors.
How should this be wired in to the phone line?
Is there a better way to do it? (I went by Radio Shack and they didn't have any modular jacks and plugs designed to be wired in this way.)
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Jan Philips wrote:

Does the phone line end in the old 4 prong outlet? Yes? Buy a converter. No Google how phone lines work. Most old lines only use two wires for signals. Other two are not used or are for power to the lights on old phones.
Lou
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No old 4-prong. It is a new phone but it is hard-wired in. If I know which pair of wires is used, should they go through the red and black wires of the filter, or some other pair?
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wrote:

As per the other replies..... telephone color coding for the last 40+ years
red & green .......line 1 black & yellow ......line 2
my last wired phine work ~2005 polarity did matter, so if you try red & green one way and oyur phone doenst work; swap them
sounds to me like the DSL filter is set up to service two lines
cheers Bob
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Polarity only matters for Touch Tone dialing. If your phone is a rotary either way is fine.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Jan Philips wrote:

I haven't seen a new hard-wired single-line phone in 20 years. Is there maybe a sliding or rotating cover on the wall outlet that is covering up the plug on the end of the cord? Post a picture of this phone and the wall plate someplace, with a link back here, please. A picture is worth 1000 words, etc. And even assuming the wall end is hard-wired, is the end on the phone detachable? You can always use a double-ended rj11 block (used to hook 2 wall cords together) to connect the DSL filter in-line, and plug the short cord into that.
BTW, forget radio shack. Their selection has purely gone to hell last few years. Try Lowes, HD, Menards, or similar. The parts you need are out there, at cheaper prices than RS. Too bad you aren't local. I'm 99% certain I could solve your problem out of my junk box.
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wrote:

I tried HD also, no luck. We also have Lowes.
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wrote:

As far as I can tell, it is permanently attached to the wall. I can't get it to budge. I have a photo now.
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On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 14:30:01 -0400, Jan Philips

OK, the photo is one of the ones at
http://judmccranie.com/WebSiteManager/imagegallery.aspx
it is rotated from the way is actually is.
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On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 14:35:05 -0400, Jan Philips

Whoops, you can't get to it that way. Here it is: http://judmccranie.com/default.aspx
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Jan Philips wrote:

It is probably hung off 2 screws or studs in t-shape holes on the back. Push up hard on the bottom end, and it will come loose, and there you will find either a Ma Bell style wall phone plate, or a special baseplate that came with the phone. There will probably be a modular jack in the base plate, and the phone either snaps into the jack, or has a short jumper cord with modular connectors where you can add a DSL filter in-line. (It would hang down in a loop below the phone, unless you can tuck it in the wall panel somehow.) I gotta give points to the installer- that is an innovative use of a cheap kitchen phone, and it took some fussing to get it to set flat like that. Exactly where were planning on splicing the DSL filter in? It won't work on the handset cord, if there are any electronics in the base. Or were you going to do it where the wire feeds into the elevator shaft? (In which case, an inline surface-mount jack and screw-to-rj11 adapter would let you plug the filter in.)
Having said that, that doesn't really look like a commercial-grade elevator emergency phone, if your local code people or insurance carrier cares. If there is only one POTS line into the building, it should probably be on a dedicated wire all the way back to the demarc, and plugged into a 'line seizure' block like an alarm autodialer uses. If somebody needs to call out on that phone, and they are the only one there, it would suck if one of the other phones was off the hook.
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wrote:

I pushed on it, but maybe not hard enough. I'll try harder tomorrow.

This is an emergency phone in a residential elevator. Outside the elevator is a switch box for the AC, but the phone line runs through it too.

Yes, basically.

I'm not sure if there is enough room to get a surface-mount jack plate in the switch box.

It is residential, not commercial.

It is on the same circuit as the other phones in the house.
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wrote:

These days red/green are your primary pair. Black/yellow is the second line pair. Green is positive but odds are polarity won't matter.
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I would do it differently, but to answer your question.
Red and green are the primary phone lines. Your existing line has 2 wires. Connect one to red and one to green. If the phone rings AND you can call out everything is fine. If not switch the two wires.
Reason: most newer phones can handle reversed polarity, some older phones can not.
Colbyt
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On Tue, 22 Sep 2009 15:11:15 -0400, "Colbyt"
What is a better way?
What I have done is cut the modular plug off the filter and stripped the red and green wires. Then I took a wall-to-phone cord (I have plenty of those) and cut off a plug with a few inches of wire. I tried to strip the red and green wires but they are so tiny I can't strip them.
My plan was to plug the plug into the filter jack, then I could put that inline in the phone cable.
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On Tue, 22 Sep 2009 16:00:17 -0400, Jan Philips

My wire stripper goes down to 22 gauge, but it is smaller than that. The insulation is tough and the wires are tiny so I haven't been able to do it with a knife without breaking the wires.
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wrote:

What I chose to do was split the incoming phone line at the entry point to the basement. Using a system of modern modular jacks I ran the unfiltered source to the modem and used one DSL filter for the rest of the house.
Next person can filter that line if they want to simply by adding another filter.
As for your striping problem a match or lighter works well for burning the insulation off the wires which can then be trimmed if you burn to much.
Colbyt
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On Tue, 22 Sep 2009 16:15:21 -0400, "Colbyt"

That left each with with two tiny conductors, each about the size of a thread. Probably too small to attach to the wire.
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Jan Philips wrote:

Now you know why the "better" way involves dealing with the access lines, not the equipment wires.
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Jan Philips wrote:

Here's a good link that can describe it better than I can:
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/phone_wiring.html
TDD
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