Wiring Garage/shop

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That is not exactly true in the 2005 and earlier codes. It says "... no continuous metallic paths BONDED TO THE GROUNDING SYSTEM". It would apply to a metallic water piping system, required to be bonded but not to a phone line, LAN or any number of other connections.
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My phone lines and catv lines are bonded to the grounding system. Why wouldn't they be?
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Your phone line may have a surge protector that is connected to the grounding system via gas protectors but it is not bonded to it. If it was you would have an unnerving hum on the line. The only way your CATV is bonded is if you also have a grounding block in the garage. In that case you do have a parallel path.
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I verified tonight what the panel said. Left says 'grounding strap", right says "neutral strap". usint a continuity meter, left bank has continuity to the enclosure. Netral strap on the right does not.
Instructions call that little bar to the very left "addition" grounding connections.
By the way, I plan on having 2 240 volt circuits, one for an air compressor one for a lincol welder "buz box". I was going to make the compressor a 30 amp circuit with 20-3 wire and the welder a 50 amp circuit with 6 guage. Does it matter if I have bothe these breakers on the same buss as the 100 amp main breaker or would that be bad practice to have alot of voltage on one bank compred to the other?
Also, do I need to have these outlets a certain distance from the overhead garage door? I would like ot place them as close as I can so I can reach outside with them if I need to,.
I'm assuming that by "on the same buss", you mean opposite sides of the same section of buss. I would tend to avoid doing that, and would set them side by side, and use circuits with lesser loads opposite heavily loaded breakers. You can install the outlets as close to the door as you like. Your 30 amp circuit will probably be on 10/3, 20/3 is doorbell wire
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*Roy I looked again at the photo and I noticed this before and thought it odd, but now it makes sense. There are two lugs on the right neutral bar and one on the left neutral bar. There may have been an accessory piece for the installer to connect the two bars, but the OP left it off. Or maybe a piece of wire is to be used if the neutral bar on both sides was needed. In that case the OP is correct in using the left side as a ground bar and the green screw should be installed. I've used the GE panels before and have never seen this. Maybe it is something new. This probably is a 12/24 panel that can also be used for service entrance hence the reason for being convertible.
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I think you hit the nail on the head. I wouldn't be surprised if these panels are specially built for places like HD and Lowes. The OP's description sounds perfectly legitimate, yet I've never seen one that came that way, straight out of the box
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