Wiring Electrical outlet

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When was the last time you actually saw a 20 a device with a special plug?
--
Steve Barker



"mm" < snipped-for-privacy@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
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snipped-for-privacy@some.yahoo.com says...

--
Keith

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A 2000 watt baseboard heater that was 120 volt?? hmmmmm . That's pushing the limits of a 20 amp breaker at 80%. Why would you switch it to a plug in?
--
Steve Barker


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You misspelled "exceeding". <g>
120V * 20A * 80% = 1920W.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@some.yahoo.com says...

Make that a vanity kickboard heater.
That's what it is. I was quite surprised at 2kW too.

I didn't like the romex wandering out through a slot in the sheetrock under the vanity.
--
Keith

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I'm no expert, so please correct me if I don't understand this correctly. I understood that 15 Amp outlets are all rated for 20 Amps. The 20 Amp outlets have that T slot that will allow for devices that can draw more than 15 amps to be plugged in. Hence you cannot use 20Amp outlets in a 15 amp circuit, but 15 amp in 20 amp circuits are alright.
Tom
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The ratings on the outlets are molded into the plastic bodies. All the 15A oulets in my stock are labeled '15A', period.The 20A outlets are labeled '20A'. That seems to indicate that using the 15A's above their capacity is not appropriate. Note that repair plugs also have molded in ratings like outlets. HTH
Joe
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Feb 2007 15:10:53 -0800, Joe wrote:

Any UL-listed 15 A outlet is rated for 20 A pass through.
--
Seth Goodman

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Seth Goodman wrote:

Today I purchased some duplex GFCI receptales and the 20amp/20amp pass through in the color I wanted was on sale cheaper than the 15amp/20amp pass through, so in this case I got the 20/20, otherwise I'd have the 15/20.
Tom J
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Good deal, just don't use them on 15 amp circuits
on

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On Fri, 9 Feb 2007 20:34:36 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

If you do, and mistakenly plug a 20A appliance in it will trip the breaker. The GFCI will realize that this was an improper tripping (since it's SURE it's on a 20A circuit), and start a fire anyway :-)

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Harry wrote:

Yea, Really!! ;-)
Tom J
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> >snip>

True, but generally preferred wiring practice these days is to use pigtails for receptacles and not pass through the device itself. Common sense would dictate that an 89 cent duplex oulet is a dubious candidate for long term survival at the 20 amp level. Of course, everyone can make whatever decisiuon they are comfortable with. Cheers,
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

The inspector I had wanted to see pigtails for neutral and ground but didn't care about the hots (I pigtailed them anyway).

Why? The passthrough connection is just a "wire". Less than a buck for an outlet with 20A contacts, I'd agree.

Sure. I generally use the $.89 variety myself. I've never had one fail. Well, there is a broken one (plastic is cracked) in the livingroom that is scheduled for replacement.
--
Keith

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I think you are wrong and I think I know where you got the idea.
It is ok to use a 15 amp receptacle on a 20 amp circuit, but not becasue the receptacle can carry 20 amps. Rather it is because no plug for a 20 amp device will fit into the slots in the 15 amp receptacle. But such a plug |- would fit into a 20 amp receptacle
You could pplug in two 15 amp items, such as heaters, one in each half of a 15 or 20 amp receptacle, and you'd be exceeding the capacity of the receptacle, but the fuse should blow when you do that. They say the fuse or circuit breaker is there to protect the wiring, but it occurs to me that it also protects the receptacle.
If IUC by pass-through they don't mean how much is used through the receptacle (by plugging something into it), but how much can go from the feed wires, through the metal parts on the sides, the bridges, and on to the next receptacle. Like when wires are connected to all four screws of the recep, two from the fuse box, and two going onto the next recep. Maybe it's pass-through that confused you, but that doesn't refer to how much can be plugged into that recep.

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Chris, I'm not saying you're incorrect. I am responding to the words written by the OP, and I am referencing the NEC

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RBM wrote:

This is getting kind of nit-picky, but the OP said "an outlet". Technically "outlet" could refer to a light, one or more receptacles, switches, etc.
A standard dual 15A receptacle is a single outlet but two receptacles, and would be perfectly acceptable on a 20A circuit.
Chris
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A side question: why is the Canadian standard practice for kitchen outlets to use split duplex outlets (upper outlet on opposite phase from lower outlet) with 3-wire wire and 2-pole 15 amp breaker, while the US standard practice seems to be a single 20 A circuit feeding both halves of the outlet?
Each has advantages compared to the other.
    Dave
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Nec requires at least two circuits for the kitchen outlets, and with counter outlets being no more than 4 feet apart, it assures your appliance will be close to an outlet, but it doesn't guaranty that you have at least two circuits at all counter locations. The Canadian method makes good sense
writes:

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On 9 Feb 2007 07:00:28 -0800, steve snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That will work. Use a GFCI outlet.
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