Wiring electric baseboard heaters

I am about to add electric baseboard heat to a finished attic space in a house that I own.
The wiring diagrams in a book that I have and on the Internet show to create a 220/240-volt system using a 12/2 feed up to the heater(s), with 12/3 going from the heater to the thermostat. I assume that means that at the panel box there would be a double breaker to create the 220/240-volt, and that the white wire would be coded at the panel and at the heater to be black. But, that seems a little strange to me.
Is that how it is supposed to be done, or is it better or more correct to run 12/3 as the feed and use the black and red wires as the hot wires?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, because there is no need for a neutral for a 240V heater. Just extra expense and more wires in your boxes.
I'm curious why you'd need 12/3 from the heater to the thermostat? Are you using electronic thermostats? Typically the 240 just goes from the panel to the thermostat and then from the thermostat to the heater.
nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
N8N wrote:

I'll have to check the wiring diagram again to be sure I read it correctly. It's in a Black and Decker wiring book that I have at the house (page 171, I think), and I thought I remembered seeing 12/3 going to the thermostat which was between two heater units. Maybe it's because the diagram I was looking at showed the thermostat between the two heater units, or maybe I just plain read it wrong, or I am not correctly rembering what I saw. I'll post back later today when I look at the book again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
N8N wrote:

Thanks. My mistake. I checked the wiring diagram again and what I thought I remembered seeing was not correct. It does show all 2-wire and no 3-wire. I had briefly noticed red and black wires in the circuit and I was thinking that meant 3-wire. But, upon looking more carefully, I see now that the red and black wires were just the thermostat wire colors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is a special 12/2 made for 220v heaters, the outer jacket is red and the wires inside are colored red and black with a ground. It is acceptable to run regular 12/2 cable but the white wire must be recolored with most any color except white, gray or green.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
EXT wrote:

That's interesting. I've never seen that, but I'll look for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also, I just found the following forum on this topic:
Page 1 of the thread:
http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?s c0c1c63201b1731097da1b981b8953&t89
Page 2 of the thread:
http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t 89&page=2
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?s c0c1c63201b1731097da1b981b8953&t89
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RBM wrote:

Thanks. Will do.
The free and generous help that you and others provide on this forum is awesome!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Assuming your thermostats are 230 volt 'line voltage type' ?????
Also don't know why you need 3 conductor; either from panel to thermostat or thermostat to heater!
More normal (and exactly how this house 1970 is wired) is 12-2 red/ black (with a bare ground conductor of course).
Black/white can be used provided the white is colored or taped (red nail polish will do) to identify that it is hot (not neutral!).
You are correct, the red and black are connected through a double-pole circuit breaker for #12 AWG that's a 20 amp DP breaker. Don't forget the ground connection at each point also. For 230 there is no neutral. Use standard wiring practice; insurance companies (both for property and life insurance) can be picky!!!!!!!
With some (double pole thermostats) both red and black connect 'through' the thermostat. Most of my original ones do so.
But I have one or two that are single pole; in that case the black goes through the thermostat and the red is connected straight through.
Make sure you thoroughly understand how the thermostat must be wired also that they are the correct type. There have been cases where people have hooked up low voltage thermostats to 230 volt line voltage and blown the sh** out of them. In one case starting a small fire!
Low voltage thermostats are commonly used to control the low voltage controls of furnaces etc. Or they can, using extra hardware (control relays) control line voltage heaters. That then becomes a matter of why use relays, where to mount them and how to get low voltage wire from them to the 'low voltage thermostats'! Different discussion altogether.
BTW we have found electric baseboard heaters and line voltage thermostats very reliable. Since 1970 we have less than $100 in maintenance. Two thermostats and one circuit breaker.
Any doubts get advice/help. In this area we have had three fatalities (all children!) and a total of 3 fires all blamed on electrical problems prior to Feb 15th, this year of 2009!
No matter what heating is used do not let people sleep in areas without escape routes; whether that is basements or attics etc. Equip (for only a few dollars) any new areas with smoke detectors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks. That's all very good advice.
I did have it wrong when I thought I saw something about needing 3-wire in the circuit. I looked again at the wiring diagram and I had read it wrong.
terry wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RonABC wrote:

s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.