Wiring Double GFCI?

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Neither the gfci or the standard "Decora" style outlet need to be 20 amp even though the circuit is 20 amp. In any case, Decora outlets do come in 20 amp, if that's what you want to use
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On Sat, 19 Sep 2009 18:36:34 -0700 (PDT), Josh

If you are using more than one recpt, which you are, they can be 15A. Or at least you could 10 years ago when I was doing electrical work.
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Metspitzer wrote:

actually if there's only one it can be a 15a. it's a duplex outlet.
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I won't ask why or debate it with you..
If you want two GFI in the same box on the same circuit that are independent of each other you feed the second one from the input side of the first one. There are four holes there for wire. I did not say line or load because I always have to look at the instructions as I don't do one of these but every few years.
If you want it so that the first one also kills the second one when tripped you will use both the load and line terminals on the first one and only the input terminals on the second one.
Always test your gfi installs to make sure they are working properly when finished.
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Josh wrote:

Really they should be fed by separate circuit independent of each other. Our kitchen is wired that way.
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On Sat, 19 Sep 2009 10:35:24 -0700 (PDT), Josh

Connect power in to the LINE side of both receptacles. The usually allow 2 wires per terminal on the new ones so you can jumper them together. I agree with the others who say you really only need one GFCI and feed the regular outlet from the Load side
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Sounds to me like you want line to line and dont connect the load side to anything. That is the way my outdoor outlets are connected NOW. Before they were daisy chained through each other and it caused me a bit of grief.
Jimmie
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Makes perfect sense, they're side by side and you want them to look alike. Use a deep box as they take a lot of space, and wire them as gfretwell describes, although I prefer to pigtail the wiring under a wire nut rather than having two conductors per clamp.
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Humor you? Why? That's nuts.
Use a standard outlet for the second one. Wire it to the load side of the GFCI outlet. Done. They're both GFCI-protected.
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providing that there are only one circuit of wires from the panel that ends in the outlet box, and no other wires leaving the outlet box: with the power off and one hand in your pocket and the other handing a check to your electrician, watch as he will probably feed each GFCI device the LINE from the CIRCUIT BREAKER panel. do not send the LOADs anywhere. see also: http://www.wikihow.com/Determine-when-to-Use-Arc-Fault-Circuit-Interrupters-%28Af-Circuit-Breakers%29
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If you're wiring two devices in a single box from the same feed - and at least one uses wrap-around screw terminals - and you have sufficient wire available (about 12 inches) you can strip about an inch of insulation (leaving the copper intact) halfway down the length of the wire and wrap the copper around the terminal of the first device, then connect the second device conventionally from the end of the wire. This scheme is commonly used with wires in conduit and daisy-chained devices. The wire is run through the box without being cut. just leave a sufficient loop to connect to the device.
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