Wiring&breaker for lighting circuit

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On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 20:11:09 -0700, Don Y

As long as he doesn't tack on "one" convenience outlet he might get away with it. Local interpretations vary.
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On 9/28/2015 5:34 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This is the problem ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ In most areas, there is no way to appeal an inspector's ruling. So, if inspector misinterprets the Code (or, is "having a bad day"), you're stuck with his ruling.
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On Mon, 28 Sep 2015 05:41:27 -0700, Don Y

That is not really true but if the boss (AHJ) agrees you are stuck. In Florida the AHJ is the state, not the local BO. There are no "local codes". Just be sure you are right before you go through that process. At the end of the day, it may come down to what plan review said about your plans. Not "built to plan" is a slam dunk for the inspector..
OTOH in residential there is no 180va rule on receptacles and you would win that fight if some inspector tried to enforce it..I have never seen one try. It is a basic concept in residential load calculations that you do it by square footage, not receptacle count. The receptacle placement requirements pretty much assure you will have plenty you never use.
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On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 19:56:38 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

You are not supposed to use #14 at all if you have a 20A breaker.
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On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 21:42:02 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

That is the idiot clause. (240.4(D)) that says unless otherwise permitted in the code 14 ga wire shall be protected by a 15a breaker. (12 , 100) It forces the 80% rule on "small conductors"
I could tell you where it is otherwise permitted but your head might explode (like a legal 40a breaker on 14ga wire)
When you start talking about "fixture wire" (your 18 ga example) that has to be part of a "listed" assembly, typically U/L listing. Typically 18 ga wire has a design ampacity of 7a but in a listed assembly where the load is controlled it can be protected by a 20a breaker. You are dealing with 2 issues, "overload" and "short circuit" protection. An overload is simply having too much load on the wire. Short circuit protection is a bolted fault where there is essentially no limit to the current but the resistance of the wire and the breaker, An 18 ga wire, less than 50 feet long will operate a 20 a breaker in a bolted fault.
At least that is the thinking.
You can still get in plenty of trouble with extension cords but we were talking about lamps.
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On Mon, 28 Sep 2015 00:32:25 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

U/L does not certify that there will not be a fire, only that it will be totally contained in the equipment.

No idea but I do know NYC has adopted the NEC after 100 years of having their own code. That doesn't mean all the inspectors agree.
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On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 23:08:00 -0400, Seymore4Head

Correct. This is a good location for an "edison" or multiwire circuit. He needs AT LEAST 2 circuits, whether 15 or 20 amp.
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On Monday, September 28, 2015 at 8:32:17 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Feel free to keep making things up. Show us the code sections that say at least two circuits are required.
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It's not short-circuits that one worries about, but rather the heating caused by the higher resistance of the smaller diameter conductors over the longer term.
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On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 19:56:38 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster
That is not legal on a 20a circuit, even if it works.
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ultimately whats the cost and work effort between 2 15 amp lighting circuits, or one perhaps code compliant but questionable single circuit alternative.
better to go with the 2 15 amp circuits....
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HOW MUCH OF AC YOU HAVE TO COMPENSATE THE HEAT ???
wrote in message
Hi. I'm laying out my basement lighting. I expect to have 25 recessed lights, each is 75watt max rating (even though I will use LED, I know I must still assume max rating of fixture). 25x7575watts/120V = 15.6amps. So, I cannot use one 15amp breaker and 14awg wire. Can I wire all the lights with 12awg and a 20amp breaker? All comments appreciated.
Thanks Theodore
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A little over a half a ton (6.4 kbtu sensible heat)

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