Wiring All Kitchen Lights on One Circuit?

As part of a kitchen remodeling job, I am replacing a single overhead fluorescent fixture with ~7 recessed cans and then a bunch of undercab lights (either halogens or small fluor. boxes). Since the existing fixture is part of a circuit that goes elsewhere in the house, I calculated that all of those recessed lights would be too much for the line. So I'm planning on running a new, dedicated 15A or 20A line.
Assuming the loads are within the capacity of the line (which I think it is), the question is whether there is anything wrong with having ALL of the lights -- overhead and undercab -- on this single circuit. It seems OK to me but just checking.
--Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oinstall at least 2 switches one for undercabinet, and one for general overhead, perhaps one for task lighting at sink.
at night the undercabinet ones are nifty.
its CRITICAL you install at least 2 20 amp GFCI counter outlet groups, give fridge its own circuit, dishwasher its own circuit better if disposer is on its own, perhaps shared with gas stove if you use gas.
you will need 6 or 7 seperate breakers will your main panel accomdate it?
kitchens are power hungry areas with many appliances
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Everything you describe (except for the undercab lighting) is already there.
--Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JB wrote:

It's fine by code -- the only thing is convenience. If you were to trip a breaker on this lighting circuit at night is there sufficient light in the area to cope well enough without a second lighting circuit? Same reason it's best to not have all lights in any area on a single circuit.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

That is more specifically, I'd recommend leaving at least a couple on the existing circuit and add the new one as well...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd definitely put the under-counter lights on a seperate switch. There could be times you want them on seperately from the ceiling lights or vis-versa. And it's the more customary way to do it.
I went through same thing with my family room remodel. I was thinking of having the lights above the fireplace tied to the recessed general lighting. Glad now that I didn't. I don't put the lights above the fireplace on that much and it would just be a waste of energy most of the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That's a different question than which circuit powers them...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, point well taken. I misread the question.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think the main question here is how would you trip the breaker, if only lights were on it?
and there's always a flashlight.
steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker wrote:

"Stuff" happens...

And in a dark kitchen w/ hot stuff on a stove or similar, fumbling around in the dark to find it can be sorta' risky when it's easy enough to ensure the situation is protected against...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Folks...thanks for the tips and feedback. In my case, the chandelier in the connected dining room in one direction and hall lights in the other would give plenty of light during a circuit trip. They are on a different line.
--Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JB wrote:

That sounds adequate, then I'd not worry about it...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Usually there is a light in the range hood as well, if it comes to that. What hasn't been mentioned yet is there is a maximum number of drops permitted on a circuit. I believe it is 12 but I'll be quickly corrected if I'm wrong. So provided that your ~7 cans and bunch of cabinet lights = 12 or less, you're fine with the one line.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, I don't see that in the code. 210.11 (A) talks about the MINUMUM number of circuits based on load, but I don't see a MAXIMUM number off of a breaker mentioned anywhere. Am I missing something??
--Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He has a Canada address, they have different rules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry about that, I hadn't realized this was specific to Canadian code. A quick Google search confirms a 12 drop limit in Canada, no specific limit USA.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good idea to place lighting on a separate circuit. Then if outlet trips breaker, you still have lighting.
"JB" wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.