Wiring a workshop in Canada I need a good book or two.

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Doesn't need a grounding rod if it's in the same building as the main.

So do I.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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I've put in a few - it's very easy and no more difficult than any 2-phase circuit except the wire's heavier. The 60A breakers are pricey though and often you get to move some circuits out of the main panel to make room for it. Then you pay $100 to get it inspected and you've saved yourself $1000. YMMV
N
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A sub-panel that is, not sub contractor.
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
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Ralph wrote:

I can't help with the Canada part, but for the "nice panel of switches" I recommend a 100A or 125A load center (you don't have to put it on a 100A circuit, that's just the panel rating) put each tool on it's own breaker and use the breaker as a switch. Panels that size are cheap. I don't know if you need a main breaker or not up there.* US code allows up to 6 main disconnects, and my panel has 6 spaces. I have one 15A breaker for the lights and garage door opener, one 20A breaker for the 110V outlets, one 20A 2-pole breaker for the air compressor, and a 50A 2-pole breaker for the welder. The panel is full, but I could change out the two 110V breakers and put in tandem breakers without exceeding the "6 disconnects" rule because each 2-pole breaker only counts as one switch. Does that make sense? If I had more than 6 switches I would have to have a main switch or breaker, but that's a USA rule. I don't know what its Canada counterpart is, but look into using a "main lug load center" for your switches by the door.
-Bob
*Might be down there, I'm in S. Minnesota but I'm farther north than Toronto :-)
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Ralph wrote:

Wiring a House, by Rex Cauldwell, is a good introduction to wiring, although it's about U.S. practice, not Canadian. Also see the Electric Wiring FAQ at <http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/ .
--
--
Steve

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There are several sites here covering wiring, check out the Hometime site first: http://doit101.com/Home%20Improvement/homeimprove.htm#Electrical
Frank C.
--
http://sawdustmaking.com

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