Wiring a Shed

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On Mon, 19 Sep 2011 16:31:35 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That may be a Canadian thing about the door but in the US it is supposed to be right where the wire enters the building. Generally you will come up out of the ground to a reasonable inside switch height on the outside, LB through the wall and set a box and disconnect on the inside. You can then fan out your circuits from there. Again the inspector would usually have some leniency if you came up the inside wall in conduit directly to the switch. After all, these are not service conductors. and he is on the load side of a GFCI. Personally I think a single circuit to a residential shed should not need the disconnect at all but I didn't write the code, I just have to enforce it.
"225.32 Location. The disconnecting means shall be installed either inside or outside of the building or structure served or where the conductors pass through the building or structure. The disconnecting means shall be at a readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance of the conductors. For the purposes of this section, the requirements in 230.6 shall be utilized."
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On Sep 19, 5:31 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I came up inside the shed and the conduit currently runs about halfway up the wall inside a stud bay. That's where I stopped until I checked out how to proceed.
How about if I continue the conduit up that stud bay and put the disconnect near the top plate so that it won't be blocked by items stored on the floor? The top plate is 6' from the floor and I could reach the disconnect after taking one step into the shed. A taller person could probably reach it from the door.
From there I can fan out to my receptacle and light switch.
Sound OK?
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On Mon, 19 Sep 2011 17:26:24 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

My dad was an electrician - and the requirement (at least locally in Waterloo area) was the disconnect had to be reachable without entering the outbuilding. My recommendation was to bring the conduit up just inside the door, to switch height- using the disconnect box (switch box) as the conduit terminus and as the junction box to the lights and outdoor receptacle (outlet).
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On Mon, 19 Sep 2011 17:26:24 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Yes that will work. Readily accessible is generally defined as 6' 6" or less from the finished floor.
I am not sure what Clare is talking about but he has a Canadian address so that could be a Canadian thing. They do have different rules about things.
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You have it backwards, you want romex UF for the feed THEN transition to plain wire (or stay romex) in the shed, not plain wire for the feed going to romex. I'd use UF (undergound feeder) cable instead of plain wires in conduit. Eventually the conduit will leak and you'll have wires not designed for burial getting wet either entirely or condensation in the conduit. UF is made for underground, cant get wet at all. A ground rod bonded to your ground (green) feeder wire at the shed entry point may not be a bad idea either, just dont rebond the neutral to ground again in the shed breaker box (if you use a breaker box). This way if your ground wire fails somewhere in the feed you will still have the shed locally grounded. I really hate the idea of burying plain wire in conduit ever myself, when something like UF is so foolproof for leaks.
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<snip>
Thank you! That solved a puzzle for me. Over 30 years ago I laid my 'twin lead' antenna wire in conduit frm pole to house. Could not figure out how moisture was getting into the conduit (dripping out of the basement end). I had constructed the perfect conditions for condensation. Conduit sloped up from basement to pole terminating about 10ft higher than the basement end. I probably could have measured a draft emanating from the pole end :)
Harry K
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Thank you! That solved a puzzle for me. Over 30 years ago I laid my 'twin lead' (may have been coax, long time ago and long ago done away with) antenna wire in conduit frm pole to house. Could not figure out how moisture was getting into the conduit (dripping out of the basement end). I had constructed the perfect conditions for condensation. Conduit sloped up from basement to pole terminating about 10ft higher than the basement end. I probably could have measured a draft emanating from the pole end :)
Harry K
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Individual conductors are used correctly in underground conduit all the time. The wire just has to be THWN rated, the W indicating that it's suitable for wet locations. In fact, many places only stock one wire now that is both THHN and THWN rated.

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