Wiring a (replacement) Electric Stove


my 25 yr old house has a 220 outlet with a Red, Black, and White wire at the 220 outet. Pulled out the old stove and installing my new(er) replacement stove. This stove has Red, Black, White and GREEN!.. at the new(er) stove end wire..want to marry the 3 wires from my box to the 4 wires of my new stove
what is normally done..?? flaco
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon 04 Aug 2008 04:01:24p, flaco told us...

The simplest way is to connect the neutral + ground wires together at the range and buy a new 3-wire cord to connect it to the wall outlet. The other option is to run a new 4-wire circuit back to the braeker panel and install a new 4-wire socket.
--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Change the cord on the new stove to a three wire cord. Inside the stove electrical junction box there is usually a means to jumper the white and green together. Connect the jumper so that the white and green inside of the stove are together and connect the new cord to the terminal block
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The cord coming off the elec. range has the metal sheath with the wires inside and will reach to my wall outlet.It WAS hard wired into the junciton box w/o an outlet..(was that way for 25 yrs) cant just put it back into the box..hard wired again???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
flaco wrote:

There are two issues--making it work and making it legal.
Hard wiring it with the green wire connected to the neutral wire will _work_ but it may or may not meet code depending on the code--you need to run this one by your local inspector if code is an issue where you are.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The cord coming off the elec. range has the metal sheath with the wires inside and will reach to my wall outlet.It WAS hard wired into the junciton box w/o an outlet..(was that way for 25 yrs) cant just put it back into the box..hard wired again???
First, you said you have a three wire outlet, and now you're saying you have a junction box. Which is it? If this is a new "range" it's not going to have metal flex coming off of it, it will either have a range cord, or nothing. If the unit is not a range, but a "cooktop", it will have a metal flex with wires attached to it, and that gets directly connected into a junction box, not a receptacle outlet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Check to see if the existing feeder cable has a ground wire that is not being used. If it does, get a four wire range (50 amp) outlet. If the feeder is only three wire, replace the range cord set with a three wire range cord set, and install the (usually included) bonding strap from the neutral connection (white wire) to the frame of the range.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do my own wiring and I'll be damned before I'd risk marrying a three wire 220V outlet into a four-wire stove. That is dangerous and most likely illegal. My suggestion is to trace the wire to the breaker box and replace it with the proper wire. I always use one gauge lower than code.
If you attach the wire to a fish before removing it, you shouldn't have a problem pulling the new wire up. It may be a little more work and cost $10 more, but you'll sleep better at night.
If you do decide to marry the wires, make sure you have a damn good homeowners policy with a very low deductible (like $100). Also make sure you all of your smoke detectors are working - the Fire Marshall checks them after the fire has been extinguish.
Being afraid of electricity can save your life.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I suppose it's ignorance rather than fear-mongering, but "marrying" a 4wire range to a 3 wire range outlet is not dangerous, is how most existing ranges are connected, and meets National Electric Code standards
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Adams wrote:

Why is it dangerous and what laws wold it violate?

Certainly nothing wrong with doing this, however considering the huge number of stoves that are wired to three wire outlets and the paucity of problems resulting from this, it would seem to be overkill.

Have you ever pulled 8/3 with ground around a corner.

Why would he want to do this? What is it about connecting ground with neutral that creates a fire hazard?

Yes, it can, but what is the specific danger here?
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I could never understand what is the purpose of 3 vs 4 wire dryer plugs. The ground and neutral are connected together at the main panel anyway. If this is an existing outlet, not a problem to change the 4 wire plug to 3 wire and jump the ground and neutral inside the dryer. For new installations, then you would run a 4 wire circuit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes; this comes up from time to time by some ignorant of safe wiring practices.
The ground an the neutral ARE connected together BUT ONLY ONCE at the main panel.
Never at a sub-panel or at an appliance or outlet!!!!!
Everywhere else in the house the ground and the neutral are to be separate wires.
Reason: If a fault occurs the ground wire (which must be of certain gauge etc.) will carry the fault current safely to ground hopefully protecting persons from shock and in many cases will trip the circuit breaker for safety. But if the neutral white wire breaks/becomes open the appliance etc. should safely stop working until properly repaired. It should not continue to work with the neutral current flowing through the metal frame of the appliance etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
terry wrote:

A 220v stove usually works fine with the neutral open. Your rationale may be appropriate for some types of appliance but it doesn't really make a lot of sense for a stove.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

With the circuit OFF, look inside the outlet box and see if there is a ground wire for the green wire. If so, replace the 220 outlet with a 4-conductor outlet. There should be a diagram that labels the wires. The green wire is (should be) the ground.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

About F-ing time someone with some common sense posted a reply to this...
The OP recanted and said it's a junction box, not a "plug." It's probably a cooktop and not a range, too.
The junction box is likely metal, and likely grounded with a fourth wire. Attach the green wire to the ground screw inside the junction box, nut and tape the other three, and get to cooking something already!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.