Wiring a phone jack

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On 7/8/2010 9:08 AM, desgnr wrote:

The colors do matter for anyone coming in behind you.
White/blue stripe = green - tip
Blue/white stripe or solid blue = red - ring
This makes up line one.
====================================================== White/orange stripe = black - tip
Orange/white stripe or solid orange = yellow - ring
This makes up line two
====================================================== The color code is:
White & blue = pair 1
White & orange = pair 2
White $ Green = pair 3
White & brown = pair 4
White & slate(gray) = pair 5
====================================================== The color codes were developed by The Bell System in the early 1940's and I deal with it all the time. Here are some links that will make it clearer to you.
http://nps-vip.net/tester/colors.htm
http://www.ablecomm.info/colorcodes.htm
http://nps-vip.net/tester/colortbl.htm
TDD
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I hooked up all 4 wires & it does not work. I even reversed Red & Green What can i do now ?
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I connected MY RED to Blue with White I connected MY Black to White with Orange I connected MY Yellow to Orange with White I connected MY Green to White with Blue
It does not work, I even tried to reverse The Red & Green Still does not work.
How do i wire this for Verizon DSL ? Do i have to use all 6 Conductor's ?
I called Verizon & they did'nt have the answer for me.
---
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wrote:

what it goes too.
If you can take a picture of any splices, it is easier for many to determine what you have.
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wrote:

Reversing red and green won't give a dial tone where there is none. There was a time when it might be necessary to reverse to be able to dial a touchtone phone, but those days are gone now, at least almost everywhere. At any rate, no point in trying that until you have a dial tone.
No point in connecting the yellow or green until you get the dial tone. Unless you have a very old, unusually connected phone.
But even wrt the red and green, looking at your four lines of text** I think you've misunderstood prior posters. Blue is for line 1. Orange is for line 2. Different lines, not different wires from the same line. 1, 2, 3, and 4 are for different phone numbers, even though most homes have only one and almost no one has 4.
If red goes to blue and white, green should go to white and blue, or plain blue or whatever the posts, taken as a whole, say.
Finally, when what you try doesn't work, try other combinations. Say you have 8 wires. The number of combinations of 8 wires 2 at a time is 8!/2! , 8 factorial divided by 2 factorial = 8*7*6*5*4*3*2/2 = 52,664. Okay that's a lot but you can cut it down by doing what Mets and others say.
**I wish you wouldn't top post. I had to copy your four lines and put them below the lines you were relying on, to see the problems. On usenet, top posting is bad from. I think it's a mistake on email lists too.

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desgnr wrote:

Find where the wires enter the house, and make sure they are connected on that end. If you have a network interface box (NIC, aka demarc box), you can open up the customer side of that and see what colors are in use. You can also trace the house feed back to where the wires split out to the various rooms.
If all this sounds like Greek, look in local ad paper for retired or semi-retired Ma Bell guy who does residential wiring on the side, and hire them to come by and look at it. Shouldn't cost much if you have all the wires in place (with no staples through them), and all he has to do is tone out the line and punch down (or use beenie splices) as needed.
3-pair phone cable got used for a lot of stuff- the wire you found may have nothing to do with the phone system. More likely, the house was star-wired, and the unused runs were never connected, or it was daisy-chained, and previous owner broke a wire in the upstream connector block. There is a lot of hill-billy 4-color phone wiring in this house, and it took me a couple hours to get all the outlets working when I moved in. It was on my to-do list to rewire it all properly, but then I got DSL on a dedicated pair, and it went way down in priority. At this point, it will probably be next owner's problem. They all work for voice, and that is good enough for right now.
--
aem sends...

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spam.invalid> wrote in message
Are you certain that the wiring you connected into was itself wired into the customer demarc box on the side of your house ?
If you wired everything the way you described it above, you are following the proper color code, you just have to make sure that the wires you are attaching to are in fact hooked up to something...
As far as wiring for DSL, you need to get your new wire working for voice first before you even can worry about getting DSL on the line... Usually where wires are available, DSL would be on a second pair of lines with a DSL filter installed at the demarc point and then you would only wire up that DSL pair to be used as line 1 at the outlet you want to use your modem/router at...
You either need to figure this out on your own or face hiring a telecom/networking company to handle the issue for you as the phone company typically doesn't want to get involved in anything to do with customer premises wiring past the demarc point...
~~ Evan
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On Sat, 10 Jul 2010 21:12:32 -0700 (PDT), Evan

So true.

Well Verizon sends its customers kits, -- and I think even if you hire them to do it, it would be the same -- which use just one pair for voice and DSL. It uses filters to keep the DSL stuff out of the voice part of the system.

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wrote:

If the telco contractor comes out to install it they put the filter in the Dmark and they run a CAT 5 to your DSL modem although that is a waste of wire.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

With known good house wiring, I might agree. But with typical 'as found' wiring, especially in an older house, if you have a clear shot to run a direct wire from demarc to modem location, that is definitely the way to go. Only need one isolation filter, you don't pick up noise and static from the other runs, etc, etc. Yes, you can make DSL work with a crappy wire path, but your odds of not having problems are improved with a direct run. That is why the contractors do it that way. Wire is cheap, callbacks are an expensive PITA. Mine is on the house wiring, but on the second pair, not the dialtone pair. I also have a dry pair all the way back to the ISP, since my DSL is 3rd-party, because I am outside Ma Bell's service circle.
--
aem sends...


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It is MUCH better to put the DSL on a separate pair after a whole house DSL filter...
That way when you start having problems with the DSL you only have ONE FILTER to check out and replace rather than one at each phone location using the DSL and voice on the same pair...
~~ Evan
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wrote:

Agree. One of the first things a telecommunications worker learns is ............. Blue, orange, green, brown, slate. The basic wiring code colours.
From that basis one gets ..................... First pair; Blue + white. Second pair; Orange + white etc.
Also agree that on the telephone side Green-Red (In North American practice anyway) is the telephone line where one would normally find dial tone etc.
It may also be worth mentioning that from a technical point of view the two wires of each pair are twisted together, each pair at a different rate, to minimize/avoid interaction between the different circuits. So it can be important to use the pairs correctly.
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On 7/11/2010 6:45 AM, terry wrote:

I deal with disparate wiring schemes all the time and if I wind up doing something in a very old house, I'll often find the black- yellow pair hooked to a low voltage transformer that supplied power to the lighted dial of a Princess phone from the 50's or 60's. I often recommend replacing the wire if a customer is getting high speed DSL, by that I mean something in the 3-6 Mbps range. Some homes have phone wiring dating from the 20's and 30's that's not good enough for even dialup service. The best performance is obtained by installing a high quality filter/splitter at the demark outside of a home or wherever the phone line comes into the building and running a separate line to the DSL modem. Here's the type I use: http://www.suttleonline.com/catalog/dsl-filters/dsl-splitters/outdoor-dsl-splitter.html
http://tinyurl.com/3a7pncz
TDD
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LOL...
You only seem to know the secondary colors of the 25 pair code...
The primary colors always come first:
White, Red, Black, Yellow, Violet...
The come the secondary colors you refer to:
Blue, Orange, Green, Brown, Slate...
So the correct way to refer to the pairs for the first two lines are:
White with Blue stripe is the tip on the 1st pair, Blue with White stripe is the ring on the 1st pair... White with Orange stripe is the tip on the 2nd pair, Orange with White stripe is the ring on the 2nd pair...
The old residential color scheme was:
Solid Green is the tip on the 1st pair, Solid Red is the ring on the 1st pair... Solid Black is the tip on the 2nd pair, Solid Yellow is the ring on the 2nd pair...
As long as you keep to that scheme and wire the correct pairs together, you will not have a problem in the future trouble shooting any work you do now... Nor will the next guy that ends up buying your house...
The only important thing is to not use the wires randomly, as it would take a skilled technician some time to sort out your willy-nilly use of the wires with a toner and probe to redo it properly...
~~ Evan
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Good thing we're not doing color codes for resistors. I might have to recite the old jingle, and that wouldn't be PC. Lot to be said for standardizing color codes.
--
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"Evan" < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net> wrote in message
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