wireless interconnected AC smoke detectors

I have to install AC interconnected smoke detectors in an investment home I own (county code) and am running into a bit of a problem.
Most interconnected require the units all be on the same wire, which is simple enough for new construction, but trying to run one wire from the attic to the basement in a house built in 1954 is a world of fun beyond what I want to do or pay someone to do.
I found Kidde makes AC smoke detectors that are interconnected by wireless. Does anyone have experience installing these? Do all units have to be on the same circuit in order for the wireless interconnectivity to work?
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I have used flex bits for years to install wire inside the walls of buildings for burglar/fire alarms, phone lines and power cables (romex and MC cable). The bits are manufactured in different lengths and extensions can be attached. Electrical, alarm and big box building supply companies sell them. One manufacturer is:
http://www.fiberfish.com/Piranhabits.htm
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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On Sun, 01 Jul 2007 08:11:30 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Last I looked, Home Depot had them too. Not a full selection but maybe it could be ordered. They had at least one 6 foot one in stock.
The flexible shaft is very helpful.
I don't know anything about the kidde but it seems their customer service could annswer that question if the website didn't.
I wouldn't think so. All the wires connect back at the fuse box.
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Kyle, I found a review about Kidde smoke detectors at Amazon.com by a fellow who installed some of them.
****************************************************************************************** Pro: Easy to install as a replacement for a wired only Kidde smoke detector. Great to connect wire lnked systems on two separate floors of your home using two of these wired units.
Cons: uses a different base plate than other Kidde products so you must remove any other Kidde base plate - which does not make sense. Tends to trigger other wireless units during installation process so be sure to wear ear protection while installing. This wireless to wired unit must be on the same electrical circuit as other wired units to which it is connected so you cannot add just a link wire to extend the wired system to this unit. You must connect the power and the link wires to this unit from other Kidde wired units. That limits flexibility for placement. ******************************************************************************************** I found information on installation and setup at the Kidde website:
http://tinyurl.com/2aucf5
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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On Jul 1, 11:20 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

[snip]
I have a definitive answer now, right from Kidde. Apparently, whether smoke detectors' interconnectivity is wireless or not, most municipalities require the smoke detectors to be on their own dedicated circuit.
Now, this is different than on the same WIRE, which hardwired interconnectivity requires. If you have three separate smoke detectors you need to run, you can run three wires down to the same breaker on the circuit box and they will all still sound at the same time.
I'm supposed to install these tomorrow - I'll post the results sometime soon.
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I suspect this is X10 type technology so they probably have to be on the same phase unless you install a bridge.
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So, last week I installed the Kidde A/C wireless interconnected smoke detectors, and installation could not be easier. I won't go into the personal simple things (like being able to install one on a box in place of a receptacle), but Kidde makes a connection harness that splices into the existing wiring and then the alarm snaps onto the harness.
The wireless interconnectivity is not circuit-dependent, so unless your municipality requires alarms to be on the same circuit or a dedicated circuit, you can wire them to separate circuits if you need to. The instructions in the box are not all that clear, so don't be confused by the part where it gives you instructions on how to connect a wireless unit into a exiting hardwired-interconnectivity system.
This is one time I am grateful for the weird wiring habits of the electricians who did Loch Raven Village in the 1950s. I usually prefer a room to be on one circuit, but the fact the electricians ran a wire off the main panel, creating a circuit of a couple outlets in the basement, the dining room and the two back bedrooms made it incredibly easy to put all three detectors on the same low-load circuit.
The key here is to not put the detectors on a high-load circuit that might have a habit of tripping - like an appliance circuit or the like. Choose a circuit that gets very little usage, and you won't have to worry about the circuit blowing in the event of an accident. Then again, isn't that what the battery back-up is for...?
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