Wireless Electricity

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We have a summer cottage in the woods. It would cost a fortune to have poles and power lines run to this place, since it's about 8 miles to the nearest pole. All we want are a few lights and outlets for power tools and small appliances. A generator is costly too, and then it needs expensive gas. Someone told us to get wireless power from the electric company. I guess it works something like satellite tv. Where can we get it? The power company around here said they do not have it.
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snipped-for-privacy@times.com wrote:

I think they're called "batteries."
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snipped-for-privacy@times.com wrote in news:hdhl741d8cl8kvpl44tn5smktid3f75g97@ 4ax.com:

You're going to the totally wrong souce. Go to church, not the power company. The CEO at church will hook you up with wireless electricity. Not only is it wireless, it's free. It's called ligntning. Once delivered, it's up to you to manage it to your needs.
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On Jul 13, 10:26 pm, snipped-for-privacy@times.com wrote:

The only wireless power is solar cells charging a battery and then using an inverter to convert the DC from the battery to 120V to power your stuff. Anything else, someone is pulling your leg.
Bob Hofmann
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:
<snipped>

I don't mean to be a blowhard, but wind power can be used to charge those batteries if you're in a location favorable to that.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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I can't imagine a windmill/charger/invertor setup being cheaper than a generator. It is unlikely to pay for itself in saved fuel costs within a person's lifetime.
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On Mon, 14 Jul 2008 12:43:21 -0500, AZ Nomad wrote:

http://www.google.com/search?q=wind+power+generator+&btnG=Search&hl=en&sa=2
You might be surprised. Great plains farms used them years ago. There was a market for low voltage appliances too. Easy to fabricate with only hand tools and off the shelf parts.
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How much wind is there going to be in the middle of a forest?
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RLM wrote:

The current theme seems to be that large scale electricity production from wind power suffers from the variability of winds and the lack of cost effective ways for storing large amounts of excess energy produced during off peak hours.
However, I recently read that the Swiss are using elevated artificial lakes in the mountains into which water is pumped by excess wind power. The water is allowed to flow back down through hydroelectic generators when direct wind power generation is lacking.
Jeff
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Detroit Edison built such a thing ca. 1970 in Lundington Michigan. It is used to "store" power from their nuclear plants.
see: http://www.consumersenergy.com/welcome.htm?/content/hiermenugrid.aspx?id1
-- Doug
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Douglas Johnson wrote:

It is "pumped storage". IIRC some of the Niagra power uses pumped storage.
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The large pumped storage ponds are clearly visible in Google Earth, about halfway between Niagara Falls itself and Lake Ontario. They are used to store water at night, when electrical demand is lower and more water can be diverted from the falls. During the day, the water is released and flows through the pond's pump/turbines, then through the main powerhouse turbines.
    Dave
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 21:12:40 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) wrote:

There's another here- http://www.nypa.gov/facilities/blengil.htm
It's halfway to NY City from the falls- but the power from the falls is what pumps the water back up at night.
Jim
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Interesting; I hadn't heard of that one before.
The Blenheim-Gilboa installation seems to be a pure energy storage project. It converts electrical energy into water potential energy when electricity is available and cheap, then converts the water back into electrical energy when electricity is scarce and expensive. What you get out is less than what you put in.
For the Niagara Falls reservoirs, the lift into the reservoirs is very small, so it doesn't take much energy to store water and you don't get much back when you release it. The main benefit is from storing water *before* it passes through the main plant's turbines, at inlet head. This extra water can then be used during the day, when the generating utilities are not allowed to draw enough water from the river above the falls to operate the main plant at full capacity.
    Dave
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There is a large ( 400 MW) pumped storage facility in New Jersey as well, I often drive through it on the way into our local boy scout camp.
http://www.pseg.com/companies/fossil/plants/yardscreek.jsp
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wrote:

The only wireless power is solar cells charging a battery and then using an inverter to convert the DC from the battery to 120V to power your stuff. Anything else, someone is pulling your leg.
Bob Hofmann
Not true. Look up Mutual Induction or Evanesent Wave Coupling So far it is not a practical method for home use, but it may be in a few years for some applications.
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Interesting troll!
Reminds that there was a newspaper article some 60 years ago, about someone living very close to a radio broadcasting station (AM Band) who constructed a large loop in his shed at the end of his garden and adjacent to the transmitting antenna. He tuned the loop to the frequency of the transmitting station and was able to extract at the range of a few hundred feet enough energy to light a very small bulb. Which he used occasionally to light his shed.
The downside and reason it got into the press was that he was prosecuted and fined "For theft of electricity"! Seemed like rather humourless response to an ingenious idea. But guess you can't have people soaking up all those transmitted radio waves and using anything other than a few micro-watts to operate their radio?
Comes to mind though; if the individual had also attached a pair of head phones and a detector diode he could have perhaps have claimed it was no more than a large 'crystal' radio? All of which can operate without batteries or external power of any kind.
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Wireless power comes from flashlights, battery-powered lighting, battery-powered tools, wood-burning stoves, fireplaces, kerosene lanterns, uninterrupted power supplies, etc.
Dick
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On Sun, 13 Jul 2008 22:26:49 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@times.com wrote:

If you think you can afford a summer home, then you're goin g to have to spend some money. Me, I can't afford one.
Someone told us to get wireless power from

Wireless electricity was my idea, 45 years ago when I was 15.
I didn't think I'd have to wait this long for someone else to develop it. I just heard this year that someone is working on it, but a) it's not ready yet, b) I know wonder about the safety of the4 radiation, c) it's range might be 20 feet, but it won't be 8 miles.
But gas is not that expensive. It's only 4 times what it was a few years ago, and only 20 times what it was when I started driving. A generator can go I'm guessing, 2 to 4 hours on a gallon. Don't leave it on all the time or at night. Get a remote start generator and keep it far enough from the cabin with a sound deadening cover so you don't hear it much. Maybe get one tht has a timer to turn itself off. Get 12 volt light bulbs for your cabin, and use a 15 volt genertor to charge car batteries. Get a refrigerator with no moving parts, or use a 12 volt picnic cooler with combination heating or cooling. Or bring ice or imitation ice from home.
Power tools can use a lot of current, so decide what you'll be using before buying the generator.
Use candles or kerosene lanterns.
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WL electricity is a pipe dream. If you lay off the drugs then you can afford a generator.
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