Wire wheel to remove paint from siding

Is it acceptable to remove latex paint from cedar siding with a wire wheel attachment for a drill?
Yes I am aware there are other methods for doing this, but I'm just curious about using a wire wheel - something like this http://www.hobbytool.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID92
That's not the one I'm thinking of, but gives you an idea of what I'm talking about.
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I think it would remove as much siding as it does paint.
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Check the paint for lead. If it is LBP, then definitely don't do it. You'll have a disaster on your hands that could easily contaminate your children or grandchildren.
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Pat wrote:

Lead? In Latex paint?
And why shouldn't his children have all the opportunities he had?
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Lead was used until approx. 30 years ago in traditional oil-based paints, possibly never in latex/alkyd paints (new in the 1960s.)
The practical point, however, is that whenever sanding or scraping we should avoid inhaling any powdered debris, i.e. wear the right sort of nose/mouth mask.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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That is such bullshit. Jeeeeze... Another chicken little.
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Steve Barker







"Pat" < snipped-for-privacy@artisticphotography.us> wrote in message
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A wire wheel will remove paint from steel. It'll destroy wood. The wood is softer than the paint.
Bob
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Eigenvector wrote:

Sure, you can use it to remove the paint. Just keep in mind that it is also going to remove the wood underneath the paint. If you hold it in one place too long, you can actually put a hole through your siding, especially cedar. Cedar is very soft and you will end up with a VERY uneven surface. You will end up with "distressed wood" look.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Alright, well scratch that idea then.
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Years ago Consumer Reports tested one and said it was pretty much worthless.

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On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 21:11:20 -0700, "Eigenvector"

I haven't used it on siding, or on cedar, or with a drill, but I have had great success using a wire wheel, on a bench grinder, on wood.
Specifically I remember a hammer handle where the wheel took off nothing discernable except a few paint stains and the old dirty surface of the handle, but there was no visible "sawdust" below the grinder. Then I rubbed in some linseed oil. Of course hammer handles are hard.
It's much harder to control a wire wheel or a grindstone when it's on a drill. Is that why they sell angle grinders? I just bought one and haven't used it yet.
Say, for example, on metal, Would an angle grinder work with a wire wheel? Better than a drill?

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They'll work fine if you don't have anythin' to do for about a year. Otherwise, hire a sand blaster.
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Steve Barker







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You suggest using a sand blaster to remove paint from cedar? What are you on?
Bob

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remove only the paint which is already loose. Stripping all the paint off is usually unnecessary. If you want to, sand the rest and feather the edges a little with coarse sandpaper. Use a good primer and paint. House paint generally does not need to be smooth like automobile paint. It is intended to protect and to look good from a distance. You can put in a lot of labor for very little in improvement.
Don Young
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He may be wanting to restore the original wood grain for a transparent stain. Or he may be trying to remove paint splatters.
The former is a huge job, and probably best done with a heat gun (watch you don't set the place on fire!) or good & sharp (learn how to sharpen them properly) hook scrapers, followed by a bit of sanding. The latter best done with a hook scraper, or perhaps a flat one if it's blobs.
If he's just repainting/solid stain, your suggestions are right on.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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I have been stripping my 1926 house, a bit at a time using an infrared stripper. The result, after priming and painting, looks like brand new 1926 siding. No paint edges show. No new bubbles form each year where the old paint is losing adhesion. No sanding marks. It just looks immensly better than the patchwork prep described here, and I bet it lasts way longer. Yes, it's a lot of work, but my time is cheap.
The infrared stripper works best on multiple layers of paint. If you house only has a coat or two, resolts may be not as good.
Bob
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What's the difference between an infrared stripper and a heat gun?
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

The thing I use is a radiant heating element in a metal shield with a wood handle. I hold it over the paint for several seconds, then scrape the softened and bubbling paint.
My tool is similar to the item below - but was $2 at a yard sale. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Bob
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