wire splice

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I have a couple extension cords sitting outside (or are they chords? I'll have to try to play them). Someday I'll catch a super discount price on outlet strips at Harbor Freight. Cut them in the middle. Splice plug on one end, and four or five sockets on the other end of the ext cord. Make a very versatile gadget. I have also used an outlet box, and a duplex outlet on the end of an extension cord (chord).
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sep 13, 11:33 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

re: I have also used an outlet box, and a duplex outlet on the end of an extension cord (chord).
Not only do I have one of those, but I also have a 2' extension cord with a GFCI on the end. I made that *long* before GFCI extension cords were readily available. I went to too many job sites that didn't have GFCI receptacles available.
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RBM wrote:

I used to work at an aerospace company in a big bullpen area--a whole floor with rows of desks and filing cabinets. Each row had a power cable that plugged into a floor receptacle at one end, then had a four-outlet junction box every six feet for 30 or 40 feet. The cable was as big as my thumb.
This worked great, until some dumbass in the shop didn't get rid of an extension cord when the fire marshall told him to. On the next inspection, we were ordered not to ever, under any condition, use an extension cord anywhere in the entire facility. This was a plant with 200-odd buildings covering most of a square mile.
Yeah, it was overkill, but the fire marshall has the power to shut you down until the case comes up in court, so all the cables were replaced with official power poles. A couple of hundred thousand dollars later, we were all official, but much less flexible.
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Steve Bell
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 02:21:16 +0000 (UTC), "SteveBell"

My IBM office got caught the same way. They ended up having to remove about 40 plug strips. Everyone got several to take home. We exploited a loophole in the NEC and replaced most of them with surge strips.
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On a chord reel, to boot!
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Sure makes it hard to roll up the extension cord.
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A bit of overkill for an extension cord.
s

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How about extension chord?
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The junction box makes it hard to wrap an extension cord and put in the tool box. However, maybe extension chords wrap easier?
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rb wrote:

Don't take this the wrong way, but if you are cutting extension cords at such a rate that you are looking for a better way to splice them back together, I suggest you work on being more careful.
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Not complete info to go on!
This looks a bit like a troll or posted by a very nontechnical person?
Presuming it is posting about AC extension cords operating at (North America = 115 volts AC) and elsewhere, (perhaps = 230 volts AC) and are probably chopping into them with an electric lawn mower or such?
Constantly cutting them suggests poor work planning???????
For example: Noticed new neighbour going length-ways on his lawn, using an electric mower, having to constantly move over and/or cut past (or even over) his extension cord! Why he didn't cut back and forth away from the outlet thereby dragging the cord further away each time is a wonder.
Or he could have extended his cord with another and flaked it out so it it was at mid point of his line of cutting and he was cutting 'away' from that?
General Rule: DO NOT (for permanent use) JOIN such portable cable/ extension cords (or whatever they are called in your neck of the woods)!
Do not ever rely on taping except for 'maybe' a very temporary (couple of hours until stores open) repair! Never use tape in a damp/wet location
As a temporary measure we have used either those crimp connectors (of appropriate wire gauge size) and/or soldering the wires, 'staggering' the joins so they are not alongside each other and to minimize the bulk of the splice.
Each wire connection is covered with at least one layer of heat shrink tubing. Preferably the type that has an internal gel that surrounds the wire join as it shrinks. Also helps waterproof the now suspect connection.
Then the 'group' of connections, usually live black, white neutral and green ground in North America; or brown live, blue neutral and yellow/ green in say Europe, are then sleeved with at least two layers of larger size heat shrink tubing to help protect and strengthen the join/ s. We have also used the larger size heat shrink to protect a chafe or cut of the outside of such an extension cord/wiring to prevent further damage. However you cannot do this if the moulded on ends are till intact, unless you cut of one and install a new 'end' at typical cost (North America) of around $3 to $5.
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On 9/13/2008 9:49 AM rb spake thus:

Nope.
Just to sum up the other replies here:
1. If cutting into extension "chords" (are those major, minor, diminished or augmented chords?) is a recurring problem with you, perhaps you might want to review your work habits, rather than figure out how to repair extension cords.
2. Fixing extension cords is a losing proposition.
3. Especially since I see in my latest Harbor Freight catalog that they're selling 12 gauge triple-tap extension cords (the heavy-duty ones) for the following prices:
o 25': $19.99 o 50': 34.99 o 100': 64.99
No excuse not to just buy a new one and be careful not to cut it.
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powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.
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Since they are cut up, and they are his. Would that be Dis-Chord?
"I cut dis chord again... it don't sound too good"
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rb wrote:

I solder them instead of butt connectors. The rest just like you. To minimize bulge I just push the stranded wires together tips to tips so they mesh together like brushes then apply solder. That way I know they won't pull apart and won't heat up due to lack of good connection. If there is only 3 feet to the end of the cord or less I just snip it and move the plug.
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On 9/13/2008 1:43 PM Blattus Slafaly spake thus:

>

Funny thing: I must be a little obsessive-compulsive about it, because I can't bring myself to make a butt connection any way other than the way I've always done it: by wrapping the ends around the other wire, then soldering. I'm sure your way is just as strong as mine, but I've never done it that way (your way is probably less bulky as well).
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ya, quit cutting into them.
s

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rb wrote:

A few years back my son was helping a friend of a friend of a friend (some rich lawyer guy) clean out his garage. When I went to pick him up I noticed a 12 gauge extension cord, on a cord reel, on the pile of "junk".
I asked my son what was wrong with it and he said it was cut so the guy was throwing it out. I told my son to put it in the back of my van.
I stopped around the corner to check it out and smiled at what I saw. I stopped at the hardware store, picked up a socket and a plug, and less than an hour later I had a 6' 12 gauge cord and a 19' 12 gauge cord - and a cord reel.
I must have used the 6' cord hundreds of times since then, inside and out, and the 19' has seen more projects than I can count. Pretty much the best three bucks I've ever spent.
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eh, I won't even splice an extension cord unless I need it right away. Reason being that the new ones being sold (at least the good, contractor grade ones) are nice and "limp" so they don't tangle so easily, are easy to wind up and store, etc. That said I *have* spliced extension cords in a pinch simply because it was quicker to solder it back together rather than run to the store and buy a new one, and I was in the middle of doing something that required aforementioned extension cord.
nate
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