Wire for smoke alarms?

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

Another is to elect them.
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Ahh, yes. The other way to get rid of them is to rename them.
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Most places in Chicago and its suburbs.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

Yes, have him wire 110V in all the bedrooms and outside the common sleeping areas at the minimum. Also wire a 18/4 FPL to each detector in a "daisy chain" fashion + one back to the alarm panel if you have one.
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G. Morgan wrote:

That's a good point, if you ever think you want to add a fire alarm panel or security system that monitors your smoke detectors as well, you should pull some extra wire. should NOT be in the same conduit as 120VAC as 24VEDEC is typical; you could free-run plenum rated cable however (FPLP) you'll need two conductors to all smokes and don't t-tap. If you do this the smokes you use should have auxiliary alarm relay contacts. The reason for not t-tapping is for supervision of the wiring; there will be an end of line resistor (or other device, but I can only think of one panel off the top of my head where it's not a resistor and it's not one likely to be installed in a residence) at the last detector so the panel can check and see if it sees that resistor to monitor the loop for integrity.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

<this applies for smokes hooked to an alarm panel>
Yeah, FPLP would be best (Fire Power Limited Plenum rated). I suggested 18 gauge 4 conductor cable to cover 4 and 2-wire smokes (in case the alarm panel is not compatible with 2-wire smokes). It's better to use 2-wire smokes because they require less current generally and do not require a EOL supervision relay module (still need to place a EOL resistor at the last detector).
<no alarm panel> If no alarm panel is in use for now, the wire can be used for the interconnect (which is required) so all sounders go off if one detector trips. And at least you'll have the capability to add a monitored fire alarm in the future.
You might also want to pre-wire for heat detectors in the garage, kitchen, attic, furnace closet, hot water heater closet...
Pre-wire for CO detectors on each floor.
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G. Morgan wrote:

I can't imagine wanting to use 4-wire detectors in a residential environment; typically it would just be 120VAC single station tandem units with aux. relays for optional monitoring.
I suppose, if one had access to a warehouse of old fire alarm parts (well, um, I do...) one could install an old FA system in one's house like a Simplex 2001 or Pyro System 3 but I'm not sure why you'd want to :)
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I'm talking about 12VDC smokes w/ aux contacts (panel powered). Many alarm panels do not support 2-wire smoke loops.
Like this one: http://www.systemsensor.com/html/cd.html?UniqueID=3
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G. Morgan wrote:

That'll work, but then you need to add notification appliances as well, and that's a whole nother ball of wax (unless you use standard 24VDC detectors with sounder bases)
basically I still think the 120VAC/battery detectors with tandem connection are probably a simpler, more economical choice for a home install and provides all the functionality you need - the full "system" is useful for larger installations where you need annunciation by floor, zone, etc.
Hey, let's go addressable, let's just get silly :)
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Just the standard interior siren(s). I'm talking about a standard residential alarm panel say an Ademco Vista 20P, 1 zone for the smoke loop, 1 or 2 interior sirens for annunciation.

Sure, but if the OP already is already paying for security monitoring (we don't know), they might as well get smokes connected to the alarm and reap the benefits of a monitored fire alarm too.

How about Fire-Lite MS9200, that's about what 255 points?!

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On Feb 12, 3:12pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Thats code, your electrician is right its not a bad idea to do it now. You will still have the chirping when batteries go low. The idea is that the batteries parallel the house power, the house power does not replace the need for batteries and they will still chirp and are monitored for weakness. But the alarms will be synched up and continue to work even on a dead battery until you get the battery replaced.
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yeah, what they all said. should just be 14/3 to an octagon box in each room, well worth it if the price is reasonable.
nate
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wrote:

yeah, what they all said. should just be 14/3 to an octagon box in each room, well worth it if the price is reasonable.
nate Hey Nate, let the electrician pick the box!!!
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You need to find out the code in your area. Many jurisdictions require 120 volt with battery backup, interconnected, one unit on each level, and one unit in each bedroom. Two locations where you don't install smokes is in the garage or kitchen
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Why not the kitchen?
I would think the kitchen is the most likely smoke induced location. If you leave a stove on and went to talk on a phone and then things get burnt etc...
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That's it exactly, you don't install them in rooms where smoke occurs in normal use. If necessary, you'd use rate of rise heat detectors, besides you don't need your entire house screaming at you to tell you that you burned the toast

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This is a good idea and well worth the effort. When they are all wired, if one goes off, they all go off.
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On Feb 12, 2:12pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

We use both types (code) right next to each otherr - not the backup- electrical type, they get zapped sometimes - most residential fires knock the power out soon after starting, real soon. If not started by the electrical in the fist place... change the batteries twice a year: dayight savings time / standard time.
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If you're doing a permit, then they'll probably REQUIRE that you hardwire the smokers. Some jurisdictions say if you're doing a 50% or more remodel, then the electrical in the whole place has to come to current code. Your area may be drastically different. Hard wired smokers are nice, cause if one goes off, they all sound off. You may be too far from the room with the smoke to hear just one. Also, smokers should be in each bedroom, and outside each bedroom door or at least one in the hallway. Kitchens are not a good place for one.
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