Wire Feed Welder (what kind of gas)?

I just noticed an ad in the paper for a local guy selling a Hobart 120 Wire feed welder. I called the guy and he said it belonged to a relative and he inherited it. He knows it works, but he has never used it, and said he knows nothing about welding which is why he is selling it. He said its complete with a spool of wire and the gauges for the gas, but no tank of gas.
I went to the Hobart website and they dont have this model listed, but have a Handler 125 listed, so I assume its similar but a newer model. Hobart has a .PDF file for the manual, but I downloaded it 3 times and it's a defective file. The only other info I could find is just a basic list of features. I think I know most I need, and know it can use flux wire without the gas, or use solid wire with the gas. My question is what kind of gas is used for these welders?
I've only used stick welders in the past, so I am new to these wire feed types.
Thanks for all help.
Jim
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A lot of people get away with CO2 on their MIGs but I assume Argon is better.
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Jimw wrote:

Argon
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Your welding supply store will sell you an argon-CO2 mix. If you are going to other type wire, different gas will be required. Argon by itself is a bit hot, and better welds with good penetration will be the norm with the CO2 mix and steel. Have a look at the Miller Welding web site and sign up for their newsletters. They have a dandy archive of articles for pros and newbies, too. There are some unusual wire types available that are good for projects that shouldn't be exposed to much heat. One of these is silicon bronze. It needs a good machine to work well, because the voltage and current parameters are quite low. Buy a good supply of consumables, gas, tip cleaners, and scrap for practice. If you don't have a good self darkening helmet, buy one. The shade 10 we use for stick welding is a bit too dark. Let your neighbors know you have the machine working and you should get lots of broken things to practice on. Enjoy your new tool, it's a very useful shop item.
Joe
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If it's not a self darkening, what number shade should I use?
Thanks for all the info and help.
Jim
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10
12 if your using TIG , but 10 is fine for MIG and stick.
s
wrote:

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wrote:

9 or 10
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we used straight co2 for years on ours. But the C25/argon mix works much better. You'll need straight argon for aluminum or stainless.
steve

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Wirefeeds use either straight CO2, or a mix of argon/CO2. The mix can be 75/25 or 86/14 depending on the properties you want in the weld. If you are doing just tubing and ornamental metal, CO2 will do just fine, and the mixed gases are four times the cost. The cost for a CO2 tank is much less, too, as they are available from soda dispensers. You don't have to prove ownership of CO2 tanks, and can get them refilled at more places because people use them for paintball and soda dispensers. CO2 regulators and tanks can be had for $20 each. A mixed gas cylinder can cost up to $300 plus $75 for the gas plus $100 or so for the regulator. Lincoln has good support, and you can go to their site and request the locations to describe all the various mixes.
HTH
Steve, welding for 34 years now
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