Winterizing trailers

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I've been asked to "winterize" a dozen or so trailers, at a camp site that is only used in the summer. The trailers are one or possibly two bedroom, with water and electric and sewer hook ups.
What are some of the things that need to be done? Is there a check list online? What does such a winterizing cost?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

See for winterizing info: http://rv.net
The basics would be to shutoff and disconnect the water, drain water heaters and use compressed air to blow most of the water out of the water lines, and follow with a filling of RV antifreeze. RV antifreeze is poured into drain traps, toilets, etc. as well to prevent freezing there. Tools would be a compressor and adapter to fit the water line connection, and a small pump to pump RV antifreeze into the lines. RV antifreeze is a couple bucks a gal at Walmart and the like, and you'll probably need a few gallons per unit if you don't fill the water heater. It is common to put bypass fittings around water heaters on RVs to make it easier to get antifreeze into the plumbing without filling the water heater. You could potentially drain the water heater, blow out the lines, pump in antifreeze letting the water heater fill, and then drain the water heater again collecting the antifreeze back to use again.
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These don't drive, they are pulled. Still, I'm sure the concept is the same. My worry is missing something I didn't know, and then a lot of damage is found in the spring, and I get blamed.
I agree, the big concern would be to clear the water lines, and put pink RV antifreeze in all the traps, including floor drains and showers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
See for winterizing info: http://rv.net
The basics would be to shutoff and disconnect the water, drain water heaters and use compressed air to blow most of the water out of the water lines, and follow with a filling of RV antifreeze. RV antifreeze is poured into drain traps, toilets, etc. as well to prevent freezing there. Tools would be a compressor and adapter to fit the water line connection, and a small pump to pump RV antifreeze into the lines. RV antifreeze is a couple bucks a gal at Walmart and the like, and you'll probably need a few gallons per unit if you don't fill the water heater. It is common to put bypass fittings around water heaters on RVs to make it easier to get antifreeze into the plumbing without filling the water heater. You could potentially drain the water heater, blow out the lines, pump in antifreeze letting the water heater fill, and then drain the water heater again collecting the antifreeze back to use again.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I believe the only real differences from an RV would be the lack of onboard fresh water holding tanks and pumps, and having bigger "normal" water heaters.
Other winterizing I can think of would be ensuring refrigerators are off and their doors propped open.

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I sure hope they don't have holding tanks, that could be PIA, to drain them and antifreeze them. Not sure what they have for water heaters. I plan to disconnect the electric and water. Not sure if they have propane tanks, will have to investigate that question.
Fridge propped open is excellent idea. Thank you.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I believe the only real differences from an RV would be the lack of onboard fresh water holding tanks and pumps, and having bigger "normal" water heaters.
Other winterizing I can think of would be ensuring refrigerators are off and their doors propped open.
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Flush the toilet and look under. Got to have a tank. My tank is permanately open to a hose to the sewer system. Stll good to add a little antifreeze.
Greg
Greg
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My 33 foot trailer does have a water tank, and I just found that out. It's a 1988.

I leave windows open to breath, prevent humidity buildup, but still use absorbers in damp climate.

I also needed ant hotels, but got rid of most of my problems, of wet wood.
rec.outdoors.travel-RV
Greg
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On Sep 28, 9:14am, "Stormin Mormon"

I'm sure you know how to use Google, so yes there are checklists on- line along with YouTube videos and some procedures that are specific to certain makes and models.
One thing to to keep in mind is that different manufacturers might have different procedures for their different models. To be completely confident that you are doing things correctly, it might make sense to put together a list of the specific models that you will be working on and get the procedure for each model from a dealer or the manufacturer.
There are also forums such as RV.NET where owners discuss issues realted to their trailers and RV's.
Another option is to go to a local trailer dealer (or 3) and asked if they have a checklist that they give to their customers. I'm sure they do.
However, in my opinion, I think that having the specific instructions for each model would be the best way to go. You never know who has a special valve or something hidden someplace that must be dealt with in a specific manner. You don't want to get called back in the spring to fix damage caused by not following the proper procedures.
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I've been using Startpage, which is supposed to be more private, and less tracking of users. Still, yes, I've found a few pages.
It hadn't occured to me, to check the models of the trailers, and see if there are specific things to do. That's excellent idea, thank you. Nothing like a call back in the spring for something I missed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I'm sure you know how to use Google, so yes there are checklists on- line along with YouTube videos and some procedures that are specific to certain makes and models.
One thing to to keep in mind is that different manufacturers might have different procedures for their different models. To be completely confident that you are doing things correctly, it might make sense to put together a list of the specific models that you will be working on and get the procedure for each model from a dealer or the manufacturer.
There are also forums such as RV.NET where owners discuss issues realted to their trailers and RV's.
Another option is to go to a local trailer dealer (or 3) and asked if they have a checklist that they give to their customers. I'm sure they do.
However, in my opinion, I think that having the specific instructions for each model would be the best way to go. You never know who has a special valve or something hidden someplace that must be dealt with in a specific manner. You don't want to get called back in the spring to fix damage caused by not following the proper procedures.
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There are a couple camper and RV places within reach of me, I'll go ask them. Thanks, that's even better idea than any I'd had.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Another option is to go to a local trailer dealer (or 3) and asked if they have a checklist that they give to their customers. I'm sure they do.
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On Sep 28, 9:14am, "Stormin Mormon"

You should make sure they are critter proofed too.
With people moving in and out in warm weather, the mice are more likely to stay away. Once the cold and quiet begins, they may be looking for a warm, safe place to set up "camp".
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Aluminum screen wire, bandage shears, and a lot of Arrow staple tacks?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You should make sure they are critter proofed too.
With people moving in and out in warm weather, the mice are more likely to stay away. Once the cold and quiet begins, they may be looking for a warm, safe place to set up "camp".
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On 9/28/2012 6:13 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

If the trailer has a fresh water tank and pump, after you drain the tank, run the pump for a little while to clear any water in it.
check for an outside shower hatch and be sure to open it's valves while you blow the lines with compressed air.
Now, before you add any antifreeze, look under the trailer and find the low spot drain plug and remove it and let the remaining water drain. Replace plug or cap.
If there is a shower with a head on a hose, open the head and let the hose and head hang down as so any water trapped there will drain out when you blow out the lines.
Take some pipe compound with you to smear on the threads of the hot water tank drain. Do not leave the plug out, the threads will rust badly over winter. Ask me how I know that.
As written already, now blow out the lines and then add RV antifreeze to fill the traps for the sinks and shower, etc.
Paul
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Sounds like voice of experience. I'd been wondering how to drain the WH. On full size trailers, often a tall 30 or so water tank, some have a household 40 gal. Drain plug? I'll remember to Rectorseal and teflon the plug, and put it back. Thanks for sharing your wisdom.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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All good suggestions. Here are some other possible things to do.
If the trailer has a fresh water tank and pump, after you drain the tank, run the pump for a little while to clear any water in it.
check for an outside shower hatch and be sure to open it's valves while you blow the lines with compressed air.
Now, before you add any antifreeze, look under the trailer and find the low spot drain plug and remove it and let the remaining water drain. Replace plug or cap.
If there is a shower with a head on a hose, open the head and let the hose and head hang down as so any water trapped there will drain out when you blow out the lines.
Take some pipe compound with you to smear on the threads of the hot water tank drain. Do not leave the plug out, the threads will rust badly over winter. Ask me how I know that.
As written already, now blow out the lines and then add RV antifreeze to fill the traps for the sinks and shower, etc.
Paul
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I got at least a 50 gallon fresh white polyethelene tank. It's under the bed. Only a 6 gallon hot tank.
My little trailer don't got nothing.
Greg
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On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:13:08 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

That should be easy for YOU! Get on your knees and pray to the Mormon version of Jesus. Jesus will then come and suck all the water out of the pipes.
We all know that JESUS SUCKS!!!!
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You know, after hearing from you cult busters for so long, it's good to hear that the Mormon Jesus is more powerful than just being imaginary. We're making progress.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
That should be easy for YOU! Get on your knees and pray to the Mormon version of Jesus. Jesus will then come and suck all the water out of the pipes.
We all know that JESUS SUCKS!!!!
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On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 09:13:08 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

In addition to the other posts, I wonder if you need to block up the tires or add extra air? Might want to ask others if this is necessary.
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Rec.outdoors.travel.RV hope that's right. Discussions going on. If you watch several you tube videos, you might find they are mostly for newer trailers. Older trailers might not be so friendly.
Quickly, empty all tanks, bypass hot water tank. Feed all RV lines, including toilet through pump with RV antifreeze. Pour antifreeze in drains.
That may or may not work. Might also need to put a little in all tanks to be safe.
Greg
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I've found a couple checklists, and a couple Youtubes. All very helpful. I'm going to have to inspect a couple of the trailers, and see if they have holding tanks, water heater drains, etc. There are many different models, for sure.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Rec.outdoors.travel.RV hope that's right. Discussions going on. If you watch several you tube videos, you might find they are mostly for newer trailers. Older trailers might not be so friendly.
Quickly, empty all tanks, bypass hot water tank. Feed all RV lines, including toilet through pump with RV antifreeze. Pour antifreeze in drains.
That may or may not work. Might also need to put a little in all tanks to be safe.
Greg
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