winter work gloves

i work outside 40 hours a week as a carpenter. grabbing nails,wood,tools,etc. anyone have any luck with a good pair without spending a arm and half a leg? thick enough to keep you warm, but not too thick where i cant grab a nail out of the pouch. thanks
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I R Baboon wrote:

Yeah man, Klein Deerskin gloves ($10US) and cotton gloves($3) for underliner.
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I R Baboon wrote:

i used wear leather gloves, and cut the ends off of the thumb and index for pickin up nails. then there are those 2 dollar pocket warmers.
The pocket warmers are iron shavings and salt in a cloth sack The salt oxidizes the iron dust and it makes heat. They will last most of the day, specially in the morning when everything is still frozen. brrrr
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always had pretty good luck with the brown jersey work gloves with the plastic 'gripit' dots on them. As long as you kept them dry, and kept moving, they were warm enough. If the dry part is a problem, wear disposable nitrile gloves inside the jersey to keep skin dry.
aem sends...
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I R Baboon wrote:

How cold are we talking about? I use Perfect Fit Tuff-Coat II kevlar gloves: http://tinyurl.com/73kon I find them comfortable down to about 20-25 degrees and I keep a couple pairs on hand. When they get wet from sweat or whatever just switch to the dry pair. Gets you through the day.
You should get them a little tight if you want the best dexterity.
I wear similar but cheaper gloves, no kevlar, whenever I'm working.
R
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cold....rochester new york
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the freezer a goodly portion of the shift. I use rubber coated on the palm knit gloves similar to what was described as the perfect fit gloves. They seem useful in the same manner as i can pick up small objects yet the palms are tough enough for the hauling of pallets. I got mine at palmflex- and the model is "atlas therma fit " gloves. Pat
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braking aluminum and covering exterior trim. I have had good luck with mechanics gloves. They do cost a bit ($35) but you can pick up and hammer 4D fin nails with no problem. Would not be good for any work where you would be getting them wet. I keep a pair of lined leather gloves for that kind of work.
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RicodJour wrote:

sure you do

shaking my head no no no

mhmmm that's all you got is some raggedy man gloves don't lie for these assholes
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On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 01:15:44 GMT, "I R Baboon"

I haven't been in your situation, but I bought these silver threaded glove liners for about 3 dollars a pair at Sunset House, probably. They were actually too warm to wear in the mild Maryland climate.
They're white with silver (aluminum?) threads in them. They're thin and they'll keep you warm. For picking up nails, you're on your own
They also made socks of the same material, which I'm sure would be too warm for me under normal situations, but might be great for colder times.
**I think sunset house is out of busines, but it was one of these places that sold kitchen items, bathroom little items, personalized stuff, etc. I'm sure all this stuff is sold elsewhere.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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