Winter Utility Saving Tips

I'm in the process of totally going over my house to save some $ this year in heating costs...Here in SC last jan/feb my heating bills were over $350 for a 2600 sq ft older home and this year the costs are supposed to go up at least 30%.
I'm gonna do the 3M plastic thing on most of the windows and liberally caulk them (most windows haven't opened in years).
Add insulation in attic
weatherstrip my ancient doors
go on a caulk frenzy to all cracks/holes in foundation/brick
setup my automatic thermostat to a lower setting (will probably have to get some rugs to cover some hardwood flooring)
any other suggestions?
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Good short term, but long term, perhaps new windows and storm windows for even better insulation.

How low is low? We keep the house very cool at night (60)and sleep under an electric blanket. Some tradeoff of energy cost, but sure is comfy. The heat comes on about 15 minutes before we get up.
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Edwin.
Are you really saving anything as the furnace will run a longer period of time to catch up to a temperature that your comfortable with.
Tom
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Quite certainly Ed is. I know I am, with deep setbacks and woodstove supplement. And ... quite comfortably, thanks.
Typical furnace is most efficient when it's essentially off (setback) or essentially on (recovery), not to mention the reduced loss to ambient durning setback.
Just don't want pipes to freeze, nor to have resistive heat-strips kick in with heat-pump.
This has been discussed ad-nauseam, if you DAGS on "thermostat setback" you'll find lots of hits: 70K on websites, and 1550 on GoogleGroups.
HTH, J
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The subject has been debated for a long time. Generally, if the down time is more than the time to recover temperature, yes, there is a savings. ( we also like it for sleeping comfort)
Heat is always seeking equilibrium to a cooler place. The higher the differential between the two spaces, the faster the transfer. This is why it is cheaper to maintain 68 degrees instead of 70 degrees and why 64 would be even better in any given situation of a lower outdoor temperatures. . It is not only the temperature of the air, it is also the sensible heat being stored in your furnishings that come into play They are absorbing and giving off heat as the settings change.
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Do what I do. Only heat the house in the morning when you wake up so that when you step out of the shower, you step out into a warm room. Other than that, you really don't need heat unless your house gets below maybe 50 degrees anyway.
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Billy - Make sure, when you add insulation to attic, that you maintain proper ventalation. See http://www.factsfacts.com/MyHomeRepair/ventilation.htm for discussion about attic venting. If you have vents, don't block them. If you dont, consider adding them. The vents will help keep you house cooler in summer, prolong the life of the roof and prevent ice dams. They will not negatively affect your heating capacity if done properly.
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Study the following web site like there is no tomorrow. Plan (over time) to get new "Energy Star" appliances, windows, heating system, air condition system, etc.
http://www.energystar.gov
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During the process of other long term improvements with our old double hung windows, I put 3/4 inch styrofoam sheets between the storms and inner windows. They are put in during winter time on some of our windows, and I'm quite sure that helps cut down heat loss. I have continued to do this even how with the window work done. Of course, it looks bad, and it cuts off the view through those windows, but its a trade off that we live with. --Phil
Billy Thompson wrote:

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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Eww.
Ok - it's your house. I've made a trade-offs like that too, in the past. My priorities are a little more on the quality of my living space now, though.
Banty (who likes looking through her new Marvins..)
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Billy.. I lived many years in "cold" country. Minus 35 degree nights. I made redwood frames and covered with 3M shrink plastic (clear) added thin felt strips to edges of frames to make a snug fit against windows. This really helped because even on high quality thermo windows I would get icing up to to cooking humidity. Problem was solved. WW
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[snip]

Build a frame around a fan to tightly seal into a window or door opening. On a cold morning set this up and turn it on to depressurize the house and then go from room to room feeling for cold air being pulled in to find all the air leaks. I found some pretty substantial leaks this way. Nice of the previous owner of my house to leave an old squirrel cage blower behind.
Steve.
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Just be careful if you have any gas or oil burning appliances as this will suck the CO2 back into the house. Turn them off before depressurizing the house. Close your fireplace damper too.
Steve.
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On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 22:38:08 -0400, Billy Thompson

I have natural gas heat, but am planning on adding a 14 SEER heat pump when I replace my AC.
Next year, I plan on modifying my fireplace with an efficient wood burning stove.
One of my neighbors has those black coils on the south side of his roof.
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I'm thinking about venting my electric dreyer back inside via some kind of a lint filter.
Keep the heat and humidity inside where I need it and not pushing nice warm air outside.
Anybody have any idea about a good filter ot use for this?
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Tried it many years ago. The filter caught much of the lint, but the oil heater serviceman showed me where a lot of it went too. Now worth the hassle of having damp dirty air circulating in the house.
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