Windsheild wiper stutter

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Got brand new wiper blades, yet they still stutter (jump/skip/jerk) across a perfectly good windshield in one wipe direction, but not the other dirextion. I can understand this after not being used for a long period, but these blades are less than 3 mos old. I've NEVER seen this problem during 50 yrs of car ownership. Now, On this Toyota pick-up it's chronic. Still occurring after 20 mins of heavy downpour.
I'm wondoring if it might not be the Rain-X windshield cleaner liquid. This is the first time I've ever used it and it's the first time I've seen this problem so severe and seemingly permanent.
nb
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I had problem with regular rainX, but the washer fluid does not seem to affect mine. Been using it for a long time. It could cause some problem with some blades. Using plain rainX put a permanent noise in the mechanism on a dodge Dakota.
Greg
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These are aftermarket wipers, right?
--
Tegger

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On 07/15/2013 07:04 PM, notbob wrote:

Possible.
I see other possibilities (in no particular order) as well:
1) the wiper blades that you bought are crap and are already hardened 2) the wiper arms aren't perfectly parallel to the windshield and need to be tweaked a little with a Crescent wrench (my best guess as to the problem) 3) something is on the windshield and it needs a good thorough cleaning (e.g. lacquer thinner, 0000 steel wool, Bon Ami, the whole nine) before it'll work right again.
Take a look at the wiper arms though, if they're biased toward the direction the blades sit when the wipers are parked that will definitely cause the problem.
good luck
nate
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My thoughts also, the wipers try to "dig in" when swiping in the direction when they chatter instead of flexing a little to the backside. see chattering... http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/08/23/fixing-windshield-wiper-problems/
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<stuff snipped>

I'd be reluctant to use real steel wool on glass - even reluctant to use the synthetic stuff:
http://www.3m.com/product/information/Synthetic-steel-wool.html
I'd go with alcohol long before I'd consider getting lacquer thinner near the car.
The simplest solution would be to get a new set of good blades of different design and see if the problem persists. Hopefully, as DD suggested the original vendor will offer some sort of discount, especially if the new blades are bought there.
Quality control on windshield wiper blades seems to be a very iffy thing. Sometimes the inserts can be installed the other way around and that solves the problem since it changes the "angle of attack" if the blades aren't quite up to snuff. My local auto parts store doesn't even sell inserts anymore since they came back as fast as they sold them, or so the clerk said. Far fewer returns selling the assembly.
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Bobby G.



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On Fri, 19 Jul 2013 17:28:44 -0400, "Robert Green"

Years ago I used SOS pad with no problems, but in more recent years, do NOT try it. I don't know if they are coated, but the windshield glass will scratch with steel wool or other abrasives. Fortunately, the spot I ruined is well out of the normal viewing area.
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<stuff snipped>

If I was tempted to use steel wool or any sort of abrasive or solvent, I'd try it on a spot that is well out of the normal viewing area. I agree, there's no telling what the windshield might be made of or coated with and how it will react to the above agents. But to be fair to Nate, he listed it way down on the list of things to try. Number 1 with a bullet is "try new blades."
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On 07/20/2013 10:27 AM, Robert Green wrote:

I've removed window tint before - even off rear windows with defrost - with lacquer thinner and 0000 steel wool before with no evident problems. However, I certainly don't just indiscriminately go after them unless a) I am in fact removing tint or b) something leads me to believe that there's some serious caked on filth that just isn't coming off with the traditional window cleaner and microfiber. Bon Ami is usually the first step though; definitely a safer choice.
However, Ed might be on to something... it does seem to me that more recent vehicles have "softer" glass than I remember back in the day, if such things are possible. Lots of sandblasting and even mild wiper scratches at only 80K miles on my current ride. I may try polishing with cerium oxide if it gets too bad.
I wonder if it is deliberate however. I have heard objects hit the windshield loud enough to make me cringe and it hasn't cracked yet.
I'm also coming around to not hating Rain-X - the guy that did the paint correction on my car applied Rain-X to the windows and it doesn't suck, as opposed to other applications that I've seen. (I've never done it myself.) I believe he may have actually used a hand steamer to clean the outside of the glass first though...! (hey, can't argue with results.) Maybe if you have one of those it's worth a try?
nate
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<stuff snipped>

That must be aftermarket tinting because I distinctly remember seeing tinted glass made on some show like Modern Marvels and it consists of an extra layer of tinted plastic being added to the "sandwich" of layers before the glass and plastic are fused by heating. It would take a LOT of steel wool to remove the outer layers of glass. (0:

I scratched an aftermarket Safelite replacement windshield with a Scotch-brite dish cleaning sponge. The replacement window scarred up very quickly compared to the factory windshield with all sorts of micro-dings but it didn't ever crack like the first one did.

Exactly. Test on corner spot or above the mirror mount where scarring won't drive you crazy if it happens.

It may well be that to make it more resistant to catastrophic cracking, they have traded off hardness. Unfortunately the method of hardness testing we used to use in metallurgy shop is roughly the same tool that firemen use to shatter the windows to rescue people.

That's an interesting suggestion. I've got a Wagner roll-about steamer that should do the trick. I gave up on RainX a while back because it did make the wipers skip too much. IIRC, the RainX worked much better on the factory windshield than it did on the Safelite replacement.
Someone here talked about RainX windshield wiper fluid. I might give that a try.
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On 07/20/2013 12:59 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Yes, exactly, aftermarket tint film on the insides of the window that has passed its "best before" date, turned purple, bubbly, etc. In that case the only option is to remove, and either retint or just leave clear depending on your preferences. (around here, "retint" is in order, it's a bit warm and sunny.)

Not sure whether a scotch-brite scrubbie pad is finer or not than 0000 steel wool... but in any case, obviously any abrasives used on glass should be ultra-fine.

I've not tried that, just the application to the glass. I also wasn't around when he cleaned up my car, so I don't have any tips for deep-cleaning the glass...
nate
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<stuff snipped>

I didn't realize how much tinting windows could reduce the inside temperature of a vehicle until I bought a used van with treated side and rear windows. I've never used after-market film, though. Given the amount of trouble I have applying clear screen protecting film for cellphones and the like, I'm not sure it's a job I could do well. Too much like wallpapering. (-:

I guess it all depends on the hardness of the glass, whether it's really glass or some other sort of material and whether there's a coating on the surface.

I had a workmate who was such a believer in RainX that he would treat my windshield for free to try to convert me. Thoroughly cleaning the glass is the key to success with RainX, and he did it with microfibre cloths and isopropyl alcohol. There's also a trick to how long you let it dry, the way you buff it, etc. When I retired and had to do it myself, I realized that it was harder to do it right than I had remembered. My new policy is to avoid driving in the rain altogether.
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On 07/21/2013 03:40 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Indeed... I watched the guys tint my latest car and there definitely is a skill and an art to doing it well. I theoretically know how to do it... but the pros make it look easy, and it's done right.
If you're considering having it done, look at the spec sheet for the various films available. I picked the most expensive tint because I wanted to stick with a legal tint level but get the most heat rejection possible, unfortunately, the more expensive films are typically the ones with higher heat rejection for a given tint level. Seeing as my car is black with a black interior, heat rejection is important! (I ended up with 3M ceramic film, and am reasonably happy with it, FWIW. I wish it rejected even more heat, but I understand that there's only so much that can be done with film.)
nate
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<stuff snipped>

I remember the first time I saw a pro "sheetrocker" work. It really is an art. I assume tint-film application is much the same.

That's why I try to buy silver or white-colored cars. One black car (the Karmann Ghia) was enough, especially since it had no air conditioner (that I can recall). You baked in the summer and froze in the winter.
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On 07/22/2013 03:32 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Yup, it *looks* easy... but then you try to do it :)
I may still try to do my Jeep myself as most of the windows are pretty flat. I like acquiring skills. Don't know if I have the patience to do a double-curved back window in a coupe though. I kind of doubt it.
I may even pop the quarter windows out of the vehicle to tint on the bench. It looks less frustrating than doing it the traditional way, although I've never seen anyone actually do it that way.

Yes, and black shows dirt and swirl marks like nobody's business. It just looks so damn good though.
nate
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On 7/22/2013 8:13 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

it's not rocket science. for small windows, i find it easier to make a pattern out of newspaper first. if you don't like the job, you can remove it with a short period of time without any problems.
however, the window does have to be immaculate before putting on the film, because you don't have any way to get the lint or fibers out once the liquid dries.
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<stuff snipped>

At a certain age and condition (deteriorating!) the acquisition of new skills doesn't seem as important as it did when younger or poorer. (-:

"Arthur" (my web forum's nickname for arthritis) dictates what tasks I can take on now. Hanging upside working under the van's dashboard is one of those things that others have to do for me now. I would guess that gyrating around to reach a rear window deck in a car is out, too. )-:
Funny how I still think of myself as much younger. In the auto parts store the other day there were a lot of people milling around the counter and only two salesclerks. When one clerk asked "who's next?" and someone who was not actually next sidled up to the counter I heard the other, perhaps teenage clerk say "No, the old guy was first!" I began looking around for the "old guy" and then realized everyone was looking at ME! What's that phrase "Ask not for whom the bell tolls." What a shock.

I forgot to ask, what's a ceramic film? The two terms seem incongruous.

Fortunately, having a Jag sedan and a TR-4 to rebuild at an early age taught me that good looks are great, but a car that starts every time you turn the key (or push the starter button) is worth its weight in gold. "If you want to be happy for the rest of your life, never make a pretty woman your wife" applies to cars, too.
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On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 15:40:41 -0400, "Robert Green"

Color of the car makes a big difference. I bought a light blue in 2006 after having a few dark colors and the difference was very noticeable. I swore I'd never buy another dark colored car again. But I really liked the Pacific Blue Pearl on my present car so I'll take the extra heat.
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As I said to Nate, I go with silver (the best heat reducing color) or white. I've found, unfortunately, that for some reason silver-colored cars tend to blend into the background and people run into them more frequently, or so it seems. I think it might be that they tend to reflect their surroundings and thus are somewhat camoflaged.
I nearly bought a "speeding ticket red" Prelude once, but my wife talked me out of it and in additon, the dealership was playing availability games so I ended up with a white one which turned out to be a better deal. They expected me to want red so badly that I'd pay a few thousand more to have it shipped from a dealer in another state. No way.
Except for spring when the mulberry tree (and the birds that ate the berries) began their month's long bombardment, white turned out to be AOK. Fortuntely the Honda had a respectable clear coat layer that took 20 years to wear off, so none of the purple and white "berries and poop" stains set in. After 20 years, I had the mulberry tree cut down because they tracked into the house and got into everything. The interesting downside was that huge colonies of sugar ants that had fed on the berries now were forced to look for a new food source. That's when I learned about Terro (corn syrup and boric acid). My poor neighbor, whose kitchen was very close to the tree, really suffered through springtime waves of ant invasions.
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I used to apply RainX when I was young and ambitious. Now I buy the RainX 2-in-1 windshield washer fluid. At highway speeds I don't use my wipers, unless there's traffic causing road spray. Absent that, the water just beads up and rolls off.
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